Cranial Impalement of a Falling Fence Spike in a Child: A Case Report
Journal of Surgery
Volume 4, Issue 2, April 2016, Pages: 31-34
Received: Feb. 11, 2016; Accepted: Feb. 26, 2016; Published: May 6, 2016
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Authors
Jimoh Abdullahi Onimisi, Neurosurgery Division, Department of Surgery, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, PMB 06, Shika-Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria
Guga Dung Apollos, Neurosurgery Division, Department of Surgery, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, PMB 06, Shika-Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria
Mathew Mesi, Neurosurgery Division, Department of Surgery, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, PMB 06, Shika-Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria
Danjuma Sale, Department of Surgery, Barau Dikko Teaching Hospital, Kaduna, Kaduna State, Nigeria
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Abstract
Cranial impalement injuries are rare. They occur from a variety of objects, and via different mechanisms. We describe the case of a 5-year old boy who suffered cranial impalement injury via a unique mechanism. He presented to our centre with an impacted 17.8cm long metallic rod (a fence spike) in the vertex of his cranium, just off the midline. The spike penetrated his head and broke off its supporting frame as the frame was falling off a collapsing brick fence. He was transported as soon as possible to the hospital by relatives, without any attempt to remove the impaled spike. An urgent cranial computerized tomogram was done, and the object was removed under general anaesthesia in the operating theatre. The patient had complete recovery and was subsequently discharged from the hospital, with no residual neurological deficit. This case demonstrates a rare mechanism of cranial impalement. It also highlights the importance of following basic principles in the management of such injuries.
Keywords
Penetrating Head Injury, Foreign Object, Metallic Rod, Brick Wall, Cranio-facial
To cite this article
Jimoh Abdullahi Onimisi, Guga Dung Apollos, Mathew Mesi, Danjuma Sale, Cranial Impalement of a Falling Fence Spike in a Child: A Case Report, Journal of Surgery. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2016, pp. 31-34. doi: 10.11648/j.js.20160402.16
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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