Pattern and Outcome of Paediatric Surgical Admissions in a New Tertiary Hospital in Northwestern Nigeria
Journal of Surgery
Volume 5, Issue 5, October 2017, Pages: 82-85
Received: May 24, 2017; Accepted: Aug. 17, 2017; Published: Oct. 19, 2017
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Authors
Kache Stephen Akau, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, Barau Dikko Teaching Hospital and Kaduna State University, Kaduna, Nigeria
Sale Danjuma, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Barau Dikko Teaching Hospital and Kaduna State University, Kaduna, Nigeria
Ajah Jonathan Luka, Department of Surgery, Barau Dikko Teaching Hospital and Kaduna State University, Kaduna, Nigeria
Yusuf Nuhu, Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Barau Dikko Teaching Hospital and Kaduna State University, Kaduna, Nigeria
Omisakin Oluleke Olatunde, Division of Maxilla-Facial Surgery, Department of Surgery, Barau Dikko Teaching Hospital and Kaduna State University, Kaduna, Nigeria
Makama Jerry Godfrey, Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Barau Dikko Teaching Hospital and Kaduna State University, Kaduna, Nigeria
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Abstract
The pattern and outcome of pediatric surgical admissions may be crucial to policy formulation in a new tertiary hospital. This study reports the pattern and outcome of pediatric surgical admissions in Northwestern Nigeria. This is a retrospective review of all medical records of patients admitted with pediatric surgical pathologies over a 14 months period. Data was extracted from the admission records and case notes of children admitted in the hospital during the study period. Information obtained included the patients’ age, sex, diagnosis, duration of admission and outcome. The data obtained was analyzed using SPSS version 15.0 for Windows. There were 191 pediatric surgical admissions representing 12.5% of the total pediatric admissions with a mean age of 71 months and a male to female ratio of 1.2:1 (M 105: F86). Sixty percent of the patients were admitted to female surgical ward, others were admitted to neonatal intensive care unit, male surgical ward, pediatric medical ward and emergency pediatric unit due to shortage of manpower and lack of pediatric surgical facilities. The most common diagnostic categories were congenital anomalies 35.1% (67/191), trauma 30.9% (59/191) and surgical infections 29.8% (57/191). Eighty percent of our patients did well and were discharged. However, we recorded a mortality rate of 9.9%. Our report shows that wide spectrums of pediatric surgical conditions are seen in our hospital with congenital anomalies being the most common. Most of our patients were treated and discharged.
Keywords
Pattern, Outcome, Pediatric Surgical, Admission
To cite this article
Kache Stephen Akau, Sale Danjuma, Ajah Jonathan Luka, Yusuf Nuhu, Omisakin Oluleke Olatunde, Makama Jerry Godfrey, Pattern and Outcome of Paediatric Surgical Admissions in a New Tertiary Hospital in Northwestern Nigeria, Journal of Surgery. Vol. 5, No. 5, 2017, pp. 82-85. doi: 10.11648/j.js.20170505.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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