Compression Therapy in the Management of Cellulitis: A Comparative Study
Journal of Surgery
Volume 6, Issue 3, June 2018, Pages: 68-72
Received: Mar. 31, 2018; Accepted: Apr. 17, 2018; Published: May 10, 2018
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Authors
Kipsang Joseph, Department of Surgery, Bungoma County Hospital, Bungoma, Kenya
Nangole Wanjala, Department of Surgery, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya
Khainga Stanley, Department of Surgery, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya
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Abstract
Cellulitis is a common condition causing significant morbidity. Conventional treatment has been mainly by the use of antibiotics, limb elevation and analgesics. There is no consensus on the role of compression therapy in the management of cellulitis. This study was a comparative study of patients who presented with cellulitis at Kenyatta National Hospital. The study was set to determine the effect of compression therapy as an adjunct in the treatment of limb lower limb cellulitis The study period was between May 2014 and May2015 Patients were randomly assigned into two groups through a computer generated program. Group A patients were managed with antibiotics, limbelevation, analgesia and elasticcompression therapy.. Group Bpatients were managed with elevation, antibiotics and analgesia. The antibiotic used was amoxyclavulinic acid while the analgesic was paracetamol and diclofenac. The parameters assessed wereoedema resolution, pain, tenderness and length of hospital stay. A total of eighty patients withcellulitis were recruited inbothgroupswith each arm having 40 patients. Group A patients who were managed with compression therapy had greater reduction in pain, tenderness and oedema as compared togroup B patients. The length of hospital stay was 10.2 days in group Aand 13.4 days in groupB. Elasticcompression therapy as demonstrated in this study is beneficial inthe management of cellulitis. It results in faster resolution of cellulitis with reduction in the length of hospital stay and with no increase in complications.
Keywords
Cellulitis, Compression Therapy, Outcome
To cite this article
Kipsang Joseph, Nangole Wanjala, Khainga Stanley, Compression Therapy in the Management of Cellulitis: A Comparative Study, Journal of Surgery. Vol. 6, No. 3, 2018, pp. 68-72. doi: 10.11648/j.js.20180603.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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