Comparative Study of Potential Thrombolytic and Anti-arthritic Activities of Pterospermum acerifolium and Sonneratia caseolaris Leaves
American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
Volume 3, Issue 5, September 2015, Pages: 228-232
Received: Sep. 18, 2015; Accepted: Sep. 26, 2015; Published: Oct. 8, 2015
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Authors
Sudipta Chowdhury, Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science and Engineering, International Islamic University, Chittagong, Bangladesh
Md. Irfan Amin Chowdury, Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science and Engineering, International Islamic University, Chittagong, Bangladesh
Mohammad Nazmul Alam, Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science and Engineering, International Islamic University, Chittagong, Bangladesh
Abu Hena Mustafa Kamal, Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science and Engineering, International Islamic University, Chittagong, Bangladesh
S. M. Arif Bin Alam, Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science and Engineering, International Islamic University, Chittagong, Bangladesh
Sharmin Sultana, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, North South University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Tamanna Jahan, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, North South University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
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Abstract
This comparative study was performed for the evaluation of the thrombolytic and anti-arthritic effects of methanolic leaf extracts of P. acerifolium and S. caseolaris. The thrombolytic activity was evaluated by using the in vitro clot lysis model and anti-denaturation method was performed by using bovine serum albumin (BSA) to evaluate the anti-arthritic potential. Here, the thrombolytic activity of P. acerifolium leaves showed (35.15 ± 1.77)% whereas S. caseolaris leaves exhibited (26.05 ± 0.92)% and standard streptokinase demonstrated (63.54 ± 2.61)%. In the case of anti-arthritic study, P. acerifolium showed (35.48 ± 0.98)% at lower concentration and (76.64 ± 1.29)% at higher concentration and ,S. caseolaris exhibited (27.42 ± 0.98)% and (59.68 ± 1.07)% at lower and higher concentration respectively whereas standard diclofenac sodium showed (52.31 ± 0.56)% at 31.25 µg/ml and (86.67 ± 0.92)% at 1000 µg/ml. The results of these experiments suggest that methanolic leaf extract of P. acerifolium showed higher thrombolytic and anti-arthritic activities than S. caseolaris.
Keywords
P. acerifolium, S. caseolaris, Thrombolytic, Streptokinase, Anti-arthritic, Protein Denaturation
To cite this article
Sudipta Chowdhury, Md. Irfan Amin Chowdury, Mohammad Nazmul Alam, Abu Hena Mustafa Kamal, S. M. Arif Bin Alam, Sharmin Sultana, Tamanna Jahan, Comparative Study of Potential Thrombolytic and Anti-arthritic Activities of Pterospermum acerifolium and Sonneratia caseolaris Leaves, American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Vol. 3, No. 5, 2015, pp. 228-232. doi: 10.11648/j.ajcem.20150305.15
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