Eclampsia and Pregnancy Outcome at Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria
Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume 5, Issue 4, July 2017, Pages: 46-49
Received: May 5, 2017; Accepted: May 15, 2017; Published: Jul. 13, 2017
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Authors
Anyaka Charles, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Jos / Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria
Pam Victor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Jos / Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria
Karshima Jonathan, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Jos / Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria
Pam Ishaya, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Jos / Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria
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Abstract
Context: Eclampsia contributes significantly to maternal and perinatal mortalities globally. The objective of this study is to review the maternal and foetal outcome of eclampsia in Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH), Jos Plateau, Nigeria. Study design: A retrospective study that reviewed records from labour ward and the Medical Records Department, of cases of eclampsia managed at JUTH over a 9 year period from 1st January 2008-31st December, 2016. Results: There were 145 cases of eclampsia out of a total of 17,169 deliveries within the study period, giving a prevalence of 0.84%. It was most common, 22 (24.8%), in the 25-29 year age group. The nulliparous women, 58 (40%) were more commonly affected. The prevalence was higher in the un-booked patients 86 (59.3%), and antepartum eclampsia was the commonest type133 (91.7%). Headache with blurring of vision 106 (73.1%) was the commonest symptom. The case fatality rate was 5.5%, low birth weight was seen in 78 (53.8%) while Perinatal death was 18 (12.4%) Conclusion: Eclampsia occurred mainly in un-booked and primigravid patients in this study. Early registration of pregnant women, especially primigravida, in health facilities for effective antenatal care and supervised hospital delivery will significantly reduce the prevalence and complications of eclampsia.
Keywords
Eclampsia, Pregnancy Outcome, JUTH, Jos Nigeria
To cite this article
Anyaka Charles, Pam Victor, Karshima Jonathan, Pam Ishaya, Eclampsia and Pregnancy Outcome at Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria, Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2017, pp. 46-49. doi: 10.11648/j.jgo.20170504.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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