Parturient Anemic: Epidemiology and Outcome of Pregnancy in Three Maternities of Brazzaville (Republic of Congo)
Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume 7, Issue 4, July 2019, Pages: 116-119
Received: Jun. 25, 2019; Accepted: Jul. 18, 2019; Published: Aug. 5, 2019
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Authors
Itoua Clautaire, Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Brazzaville University Hospital, Brazzaville, Congo
Ngaliba Olivia Firmine, Department of Clinical Hematology, University Hospital of Brazzaville, Brazzaville, Congo
Buambo Gauthier Régis Jostin, Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Brazzaville University Hospital, Brazzaville, Congo
Ngami Ariane Glore, Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Brazzaville University Hospital, Brazzaville, Congo
Mokoko Jules César, Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Brazzaville University Hospital, Brazzaville, Congo
Ngakengni Neli Yvette, Neonatology Department, Brazzaville University Hospital, Brazzaville, Congo
Eouani Max Lévy Eméry, Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Loandjili General Hospital, Pointe Noire, Congo
Iloki Léon Hervé, Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Brazzaville University Hospital, Brazzaville, Congo
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Abstract
Objective: Anemia during childbirth remains a concern for reproductive health personnel, both in terms of frequency and the risks involved in all periods of pregnancy and childbirth. This work aims to analyze the epidemiological profile of anemic parturient and the outcome of their pregnancy. Methods: A multicenter case-control study conducted from February 1st to July 31st, 2017, in three Brazzaville maternity clinics, comparing the ratio of one case for two controls, the anemic parturient (n = 67) to those without anemia (n = 134). Any parturient with a hemoglobin level < 11 g / dl was considered anemic. The variables studied were sociodemographic and reproductive, related to anemia, per and postpartum. Results: Sixty-seven anemic parturient were recorded among 10,106 deliveries, a frequency of 0.7%. Anemic female parturient were older (30.1 ± 1.6 years vs 27.5 ± 1.9 years, p < 0.05), out of school (OR = 13.1 [1.5-111], p < 0.05) and unemployed (OR = 3.8 [2.1-7.2], p < 0.05). The mean hemoglobin level was 8.1 ± 0.1g / dl vs 12.1 ± 0.8g / dl. Anemia was microcytic hypochromic (28.4%) and normochromic normocytic (71.6%). Anemia was mild (40.3%), moderate (44.7%) and severe (15%). Delivery was more by caesarean section in cases (97% vs 1.5%, p < 0.05) with a higher recourse to blood transfusion (55.4% vs 3.8%, OR = 29.9 [10.8-82.6], p < 0.05). Maternal lethality was 13-fold higher in case of anemia (OR = 13 [1.5-111], p < 0.05). Neonatal morbidity was represented by poor adaptation to extrauterine life (OR = 40.7 [9.1-180.7), p < 0.05), hypotrophy (OR = 21.9 [7.2-67.1], p < 0.05), prematurity (OR = 6.6 [2.6-16.9], p < 0.05), neonatal resuscitation (OR = 35.4 [10.2-122.5), p < 0.05) and neonatal transfer (OR = 2.8 [2-4], p < 0.05). Neonatal lethality was three times higher in case of anemia (OR = 3.3 [2.6-4.8], p < 0.05). Conclusion: Maternal and neonatal prognosis is poor in anemic female parturient. Reducing the maternal and fetal impact of anemia during childbirth requires early detection and case management during prenatal contact.
Keywords
Anemia, Childbirth, Epidemiology, Prognosis, Brazzaville
To cite this article
Itoua Clautaire, Ngaliba Olivia Firmine, Buambo Gauthier Régis Jostin, Ngami Ariane Glore, Mokoko Jules César, Ngakengni Neli Yvette, Eouani Max Lévy Eméry, Iloki Léon Hervé, Parturient Anemic: Epidemiology and Outcome of Pregnancy in Three Maternities of Brazzaville (Republic of Congo), Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Vol. 7, No. 4, 2019, pp. 116-119. doi: 10.11648/j.jgo.20190704.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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