Admissions and Outcomes of Intensive Care Management of Severe Head Injured Patients in Non-Neurosurgical Centres
Journal of Anesthesiology
Volume 2, Issue 2, March 2014, Pages: 18-21
Received: Apr. 27, 2014; Accepted: May 15, 2014; Published: May 30, 2014
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Authors
Abubakar Sadiq Adamu, Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
Abubakar Alhaji Bakari, Department of Surgery, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
Usman Mohammed Tela, Department of Surgery, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
Babayo Deba Usman, Department of Surgery, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
Yusuf Bukar Ngamdu, Department of Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT), University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Borno state, Nigeria
Sambo Tanimu Yusuf, Department of Anaesthesia, Federal Teaching Hospital, Gombe, Gombe state, Nigeria
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Abstract
Background: The admissions and outcomes of intensive care management of severe head injured patients depend not only on the standard and effectiveness of the treatment obtained but also on the available technical and human resources. We aimed at auditing the admissions and indeed the outcomes of severe head injured patients admitted in our non-neurosurogical centres. Patients and Methods: This was a retrospective review of the demographic, clinical with neurological data and outcomes of the management of all severely head injured patients admitted to the Intensive Care Units (ICU) of the Federal Teaching Hospital, Gombe and University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Nigeria, for three year duration from January, 2007- December, 2009. Results: The total of 258 cases were retrieved and analyzed within the period under review. Two hundred and thirty one (n=231, 89.53%) were males and twenty seven (n=27, 10.47%) were females. The ages ranges between 1-70 years old with the mean ages of 31.29 (SD=15.66). The length of stay (LOS) from admission to discharge ranged from 1-29 days with the mean of 5.80 days (SD= 6.06) while, the LOS from admission to death ranged from 1-24 days with the mean of 3.62days (SD=4.14). Majority (91.8%) of the causes of the head injury were due to RTA with the mortality rates of 27.9%. Conclusions: A well equipped ICU would greatly facilitate the care of the severely head injured patients and can be an achievable goal in developing countries, if there is rational allocation of resources despite the prevailing challenges. We therefore, recommend the establishment of ICU in general and to encourage physicians to develop interest in the management of severely head injured patients even in a non-neurosurgical ICU.
Keywords
Admissions, Outcomes, Severe Head Injury, Management, Non-Surgical ICU
To cite this article
Abubakar Sadiq Adamu, Abubakar Alhaji Bakari, Usman Mohammed Tela, Babayo Deba Usman, Yusuf Bukar Ngamdu, Sambo Tanimu Yusuf, Admissions and Outcomes of Intensive Care Management of Severe Head Injured Patients in Non-Neurosurgical Centres, Journal of Anesthesiology. Vol. 2, No. 2, 2014, pp. 18-21. doi: 10.11648/j.ja.20140202.12
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