Soil Temperature and Physiological Response of Cotton to Alternate Partial Root-Zone Furrow Irrigation in the Oasis Field of Northwest China
International Journal of Environmental Protection and Policy
Volume 4, Issue 6, November 2016, Pages: 162-170
Received: Dec. 2, 2016; Published: Dec. 7, 2016
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Authors
Wang Zhenchang, Key Laboratory of Efficient Irrigation–Drainage and Agricultural Soil–Water Environment in Southern China, Ministry of Education, College of Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, China; College of Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, China
Chen Sheng, Key Laboratory of Efficient Irrigation–Drainage and Agricultural Soil–Water Environment in Southern China, Ministry of Education, College of Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, China; College of Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, China
Wang Junyi, Key Laboratory of Efficient Irrigation–Drainage and Agricultural Soil–Water Environment in Southern China, Ministry of Education, College of Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, China; College of Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, China
Yu Yinglei, College of Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, China
Gao Yaxian, College of Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, China
Zhu Jianbin, College of Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, China
Cao Yu, College of Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, China
Lu Yangyang, College of Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, China
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Abstract
The shortage of water resource severely affect the sustainability of the agricultural systems in the arid regions of China. Enhancing water use efficiency of irrigated agriculture is a high priority for agricultural improvement in China. Alternate Partial Root-zone Furrow irrigation (AFI) has been proved to be an effective water-saving irrigation method in the oasis field of northwest China, whereas the responses of soil temperature to AFI was seldomly studied. In this study, the field experiment was carried out in 2007 at Xuebai Experimental Station of Minqin Agricultural Extension Center of Gansu to study the changes of soil temperature as well as physiological responses of cotton to different irrigation regimes, i.e. alternate partial root-zone furrow irrigation (AFI, neighboring two furrows alternatively watered) and conventional furrow irrigation (CFI, all furrows watered) under plastic film mulching with the same irrigation level (24 mm for each irrigation). Results indicated that the differences of soil temperature of two neighboring furrows in AFI were significant (P<0.05), the values of the drying furrow always being higher than those of the irrigated ones. The data also showed that when approaching the next irrigation cycle, both the two furrows in AFI had similar soil temperature at the depth of 0-25cm. Soil temperature difference between the irrigated and the drying furrows reached as high as 4°C after irrigation, and decreased to almost 0°C at the end of the irrigation cycle. The difference of daily average soil temperature of ridge between AFI and CFI during the growing season was not apparent in the first and second irrigation cycle, whereas in the third and fourth irrigation cycle (approximately after the budding stage), the differences between them become significant(P<0.05); there were significant positive linear relationships between Tn/Ts (the ratio of average soil temperature of north furrows and south furrows) and SWCw/SWCd (the ratio of average SWC of irrigated furrows and the drying ones) (R2=0.703, P<0.01); The WUE-A/WUE-C(the ratios of WUE of AFI and CFI) were more than 1.0 in the first few days after irrigation, whereas at the end of the irrigation cycle, the value declined to be the lowest (0.75); There was no significant difference for the seed cotton yield of AFI and CFI, whereas the percentages of pre-frost seed cotton of AFI was significant higher than that of CFI (P<0.05). This study could provide valuable data for the implement of AFI in the oasis field of northwest China.
Keywords
Cotton, Alternate Partial Root-Zone Furrow Irrigation, Soil Temperature, Soil Water Content
To cite this article
Wang Zhenchang, Chen Sheng, Wang Junyi, Yu Yinglei, Gao Yaxian, Zhu Jianbin, Cao Yu, Lu Yangyang, Soil Temperature and Physiological Response of Cotton to Alternate Partial Root-Zone Furrow Irrigation in the Oasis Field of Northwest China, International Journal of Environmental Protection and Policy. Vol. 4, No. 6, 2016, pp. 162-170. doi: 10.11648/j.ijepp.20160406.12
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