ARC. GIS Based Interpretation of Ground Water Pollution: A Case Study of Coastal Area District Badin, Sindh, Pakistan
Hydrology
Volume 3, Issue 1, January 2015, Pages: 11-21
Received: Apr. 3, 2015; Accepted: Apr. 13, 2015; Published: Apr. 24, 2015
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Authors
Mohammad Amin Qureshi, Centre for Environmental Sciences, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Sindh, Pakistan
Ghulam Murtaza Mastoi, Centre for Environmental Sciences, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Sindh, Pakistan
Abdul Aziz Mastoi, Centre for Environmental Sciences, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Sindh, Pakistan
Muhammad Ali Bhatti, Centre for Environmental Sciences, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Sindh, Pakistan
Ali Muhammad Rind, Centre for Environmental Sciences, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Sindh, Pakistan
Saima Chandio, Centre for Environmental Sciences, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Sindh, Pakistan
Abdul Waheed Mastoi, Centre for Environmental Sciences, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Sindh, Pakistan
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Abstract
The border line of Arabian Sea, near district Badin, Sindh, Pakistan was selected as a case study for the investigation of heavy metal concentration in ground water. Ground water is used for human consumption as well as agricultural purposes due to shortage of fresh water in the area. Badin Coastal area is poverty stricken, socio-economically backward, politically ignored, frequently affected and hit by natural disasters. Area is known by stormy cyclones, monsoon heavy rains, floods, tidal sea water intrusion and sea erosion. Study area has not been highlighted properly yet. Highly polluted waste water of Mega project Left Bank Outfall Drain (LBOD) which carries complexes of pollutants of agriculture run off, industrial and municipal effluents of different districts, are being disposed into Arabian Sea, passing through coastal areas of district Badin, contaminating lakes, lagoons, ground water and soils. Tidal sea water of Arabian Sea also pollutes ground water through seepage. The attempts were made to understand the effects on ground drinking water and results were interpreted by Arc GIS maps, to meet the current trends of research. The objective was to investigate ground water pollution extent in the area due to drains and tidal sea water. Sixteen (16) samples of ground water were collected from different villages near coastal area. The average data of various parameters of ground water near coastal were: pH 7.40 ± 0.3758, E.C(ms/cm) 7.45±6.8166, TDS(mg/L) 4044±3876.8, Cu 0.1821±0.486, Zn 0.1399±0.205,Co (mg/L) 0.0900±0.094, Cd(mg/L) 0.0244±0.010, Fe(mg/L) 0.3260±0.591,Ni(mg/L) 0.0055±0.012, Pb(µg/L) 0.1312±0.144. The evaluated results indicated that Left Bank Outfall Drain and sea water intrusion are major contributor for ground water pollution and ground water was found to be unfit for drinking purposes.
Keywords
Ground Water, Coastal Area, Badin, GIS (Geographic Information System), Saline Intrusion, Drains, Left Bank Outfall Drain (LBOD), Run Kutch, Lagoons
To cite this article
Mohammad Amin Qureshi, Ghulam Murtaza Mastoi, Abdul Aziz Mastoi, Muhammad Ali Bhatti, Ali Muhammad Rind, Saima Chandio, Abdul Waheed Mastoi, ARC. GIS Based Interpretation of Ground Water Pollution: A Case Study of Coastal Area District Badin, Sindh, Pakistan, Hydrology. Vol. 3, No. 1, 2015, pp. 11-21. doi: 10.11648/j.hyd.20150301.12
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