Geochemical Characterization of Potential Source Rock of the Central (Saltpond) Basin, Ghana
International Journal of Oil, Gas and Coal Engineering
Volume 2, Issue 2, March 2014, Pages: 19-27
Received: May 5, 2014; Accepted: May 15, 2014; Published: May 30, 2014
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Authors
S. Bansah, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Manitoba, 240 Wallace Building, Winnipeg, Canada, MB R3T 2N2; Geological Engineering Department, KNUST, Kumasi-Ghana, 03220
E. K. Nyantakyi, School of Earth Sciences, Yangtze University, Caidian Wuhan, 430100, Hubei, China; Civil Engineering Department, Kumasi Polytechnic, P.O. Box 854, Kumasi-Ghana, 03220
L. A. Awuni, Geological Engineering Department, KNUST, Kumasi-Ghana, 03220; Ghana National Petroleum Cooperation, PMB, Petroleum House, Tema
J. K. Borkloe, School of Earth Sciences, Yangtze University, Caidian Wuhan, 430100, Hubei, China
Gong Qin, School of Earth Sciences, Yangtze University, Caidian Wuhan, 430100, Hubei, China
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Abstract
This research characterized the potential source rock of 3 exploratory wells from the Central (Saltpond) Basin, Ghana. Ten (10) samples each of the drilled cuttings from the three key exploratory wells were geochemically characterized for total organic carbon contents (TOC), rock-eval pyrolysis techniques and vitrinite reflectance measurements (Ro). The results revealed that they have fair to good total organic carbon (TOC) contents, suggesting that there might exist conditions in the Saltpond Basin that favour organic matter production and preservation. The rock-eval results showed that all the samples from the 3 exploratory wells contain predominantly types II and III kerogen with a capacity to generate gas-oil and gas respectively. They have good generation potential. Results of the vitrinite reflectance measurement also reveal that all the samples from the 3 exploratory wells have poor to low source-rock grade. The Saltpond Basin can be regarded as having fair petroleum source rocks and could be part of a petroleum system if sufficient burial and maturation have occurred.
Keywords
Central (Saltpond) Basin, Core Samples, Total Organic Carbon Content, Rock-Eval, Vitrinite Reflectance
To cite this article
S. Bansah, E. K. Nyantakyi, L. A. Awuni, J. K. Borkloe, Gong Qin, Geochemical Characterization of Potential Source Rock of the Central (Saltpond) Basin, Ghana, International Journal of Oil, Gas and Coal Engineering. Vol. 2, No. 2, 2014, pp. 19-27. doi: 10.11648/j.ogce.20140202.12
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