The Estimation of Dose Relationships for the Inhalation of Radon and the Difference in Activities During the Year Using RAD7 in Iraq
Science Journal of Energy Engineering
Volume 5, Issue 5, October 2017, Pages: 109-123
Received: Jul. 1, 2017; Accepted: Jul. 18, 2017; Published: Oct. 31, 2017
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Authors
Yousif Muhsin Zayir AL-Bakhat, Radiation and Safety Directorate, Ministry of Science and Technology, Baghdad, Iraq
Batool Fayidh Mohammed, Department of Physics, College of Science for Women, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq
Takrid Muneam Nafae, Radiation and Safety Directorate, Ministry of Science and Technology, Baghdad, Iraq
Nidhala H. K. AL-ANI, Department of Physics, College of Science for Women, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq
Abbas Alamiry, Radiation and Safety Directorate, Ministry of Science and Technology, Baghdad, Iraq
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Abstract
Exposure to radon and its daughters is one of the important contributions for radiation doses to the publics. In this study, concentrations of radon gas were measured in air at Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Site and some surrounding areas. Measurements were achieved by RAD7 (radon detector), manufactured by DURRIDGE COMPANY Inc. Indoor radon concentration plays a vital role in the total effective dose in the indoor environments. The measurement of the indoor radon concentrations ranged from (4.96±4.4 to 102±25) Bq/m3 this high value of radon has been found at Decommissioning Directorate /emergency room, which is lower than the action value recommended by the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) which is (148 Bq/m3) while the lowest value has been founded in the Central Laboratories Directorate \ models Room. These values were used to calculate the annual effective dose, the dose exposed to the soft tissues other than the lungs Dsoft tissue, the dose rate due to alpha-radiation Dlung and the effective dose equivalent rate Heff. The values of the annual effective doses for 222Rn inhalation by the people were calculated and ranged from (0.124992 to 2.5704) mSv/y these result are lower than the value of (10 mSv/y) recommended by the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). It has been observed that winter concentration of indoor radon are greater than summer concentrations. The higher amount in the winter is attributed to the observation that people normally keep their windows closed during the winter, allowing indoor radon concentrations to rise. The lower radon concentrations in the summer might occur because people often open their windows, allowing low-radon outside air to enter the home. The results from this study show that the region has background radioactivity levels within the natural limits.
Keywords
Radon, Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Site, RAD7
To cite this article
Yousif Muhsin Zayir AL-Bakhat, Batool Fayidh Mohammed, Takrid Muneam Nafae, Nidhala H. K. AL-ANI, Abbas Alamiry, The Estimation of Dose Relationships for the Inhalation of Radon and the Difference in Activities During the Year Using RAD7 in Iraq, Science Journal of Energy Engineering. Vol. 5, No. 5, 2017, pp. 109-123. doi: 10.11648/j.sjee.20170505.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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