Optimization and Utilization of Wastepaper for Bio-energy Production
Science Journal of Energy Engineering
Volume 3, Issue 6, December 2015, Pages: 46-53
Received: Jul. 25, 2015; Accepted: Aug. 21, 2015; Published: Feb. 24, 2016
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Authors
Solomon Hailu, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Mekelle Institute of Technology, Mekelle University, Tigray, Ethiopia
Solomon Kahsay G. Mariam, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Mekelle Institute of Technology, Mekelle University, Tigray, Ethiopia
Tesfay Berhe, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Mekelle Institute of Technology, Mekelle University, Tigray, Ethiopia; Department of Chemical Engineering, Kombolcha Institute of Technology, Wollo University, Amhara, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Bioenergy future depends on an increased share of renewable energy, especially in developing countries. Bioconversion of lignocellulosic based biomass to ethanol is significantly hindered by the structural and chemical complexity of biomass, which makes these materials a challenge to be used as feed stocks for cellulosic ethanol production. Bioethanol is one of the most important alternative renewable energy sources that substitute the fossil fuels. Wastepaper has a content of cellulose and hemicelluloses, which make it suitable as fermentation substrate when hydrolyzed. The objective of this work is ethanol production from wastepaper by fermentation process. Eight laboratory experiments were conducted to produce bioethanol from wastepaper. By using Design Expert 7 software, it was formulated the dilute acid hydrolysis step to investigate the effects of hydrolysis parameters on yield of ethanol and optimum condition. All the three hydrolysis parameters were significant variables for the yield of ethanol. The optimum combinations of the three factors chosen for optimum ethanol yield 10.86 ml/50 g sample were 92.59°C hydrolysis temperature, 30 minutes hydrolysis time and 1%v/v acid concentration.
Keywords
Bioethanol, Distillation, Fermentation, Hydrolysis, Wastepaper
To cite this article
Solomon Hailu, Solomon Kahsay G. Mariam, Tesfay Berhe, Optimization and Utilization of Wastepaper for Bio-energy Production, Science Journal of Energy Engineering. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 46-53. doi: 10.11648/j.sjee.20150306.11
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