Forward and Backward Logistic Regression Analysis to Give the Estimation of Tight Diabetes Control: Review
International Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology
Volume 2, Issue 1, March 2017, Pages: 1-4
Received: Jan. 28, 2017; Accepted: Feb. 13, 2017; Published: Mar. 2, 2017
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Authors
Mansour Awad M., Private Sector Management, General Directorate of Health Affairs, (MOH), Medina, Saudi Arabia
Al Shalahi Mohammed H., Planning and Training Management, General Directorate of Health Affairs, (MOH), Medina, Saudi Arabia
Al Johani Abdulrahman, Medical Surgical Nursing Department, Faculty of Nursing, Taibah University, Medina, Saudi Arabia
Rami M. Al Mutairi, General Medical Complex, General Directorate of Health Affairs, (MOH), Medina, Saudi Arabia
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Abstract
Poor glycemic control is a major public health problem. In Saudi Arabia, the incidence of poor glycemic control was high among patients with diabetes mellitus. Good glycemic control is a major objective for the prevention or postponement of long-term complications from diabetes. Marker of diabetes control is the glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has designated an HbA1c level of <7% as a goal for optimal blood glucose control. The majority of the population today has poorly understood the implication of statistics in the field of medicine. People often refer to statistics as merely as the science of numbers and that its relationship to another field of sciences is far beyond their knowledge and comprehension. Albeit the fact that absolute certainty in medicine is rare, statistics is still utilized to interpret data. In fact, scientists used different statistical methods to improve medicine. For many years, medicine had evolved and reached its present advancement through studies that used the statistical technique for data analysis. However, in this study, logistic regression analysis, the predictors of poor glycemic control were only positive family history of diabetes (OR=3.45, 95% CI: 1.29-9.18) and on oral hypoglycemic agents (OR=78.14, 95% CI=8.88-687.69), and on insulin/combination treatment (OR=37.57, 95% CI: 4.07-346.55) than diet alone. This rather high proportion of poor glycemic control implies the need for the Diabetic Centre to make an effort to develop continuing educational programs that emphasize lifestyle modification and the importance of adherence to a treatment regimen for glycemic control among diabetic patients. This rather high proportion of poor glycemic control implies the need for the Diabetic Centre to make an effort to develop continuing educational programs that emphasize lifestyle modification and the importance of adherence to a treatment regimen for glycemic control among diabetic patients.
Keywords
Forward LR, Backward LR, Diabetes Mellitus, Obesity, Physical Activities, Logistic Regression Analysis
To cite this article
Mansour Awad M., Al Shalahi Mohammed H., Al Johani Abdulrahman, Rami M. Al Mutairi, Forward and Backward Logistic Regression Analysis to Give the Estimation of Tight Diabetes Control: Review, International Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology. Vol. 2, No. 1, 2017, pp. 1-4. doi: 10.11648/j.ijde.20170201.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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