Application of Atomic and Molecular Physics in the Atmosphere
American Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics
Volume 4, Issue 6, November 2016, Pages: 89-92
Received: Nov. 3, 2016; Accepted: Dec. 5, 2016; Published: Jan. 6, 2017
Views 756      Downloads 44
Authors
Mohamed Habib Ahmed Elkanzi, Department of Astronomy and Meteorology, Faculty of Science and Technology Omdurman Islamic University, Omdurman, Sudan
Abdelnabi Ali Elamin, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology Omdurman Islamic University, Omdurman Sudan
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
The most important of a long term changes in structure of the atmosphere due to the concentration of various species in the upper atmosphere. The gaseous or vaporous shell that surrounds the earth. When early man first sought to understand his physics environment, his greatest awe surely concerned the sun, moon, planets, and stars (which became the basis of the science of astronomy or astrophysics), and next he wondered at the winds and storms, rain and snom, ironment, his greatest awe surely concerned the sun, moon, planets, and stars (which became the basis of the science of astronomy or astrophysics), and next he wondered at the winds and storms, rain and snow, clouds, lighting, and thunder that collectively made up his weather. The Greek root atmos, meaning air or vapor, originally derived from the word for winds. The first impetus to meteorological theory was given by the puzzling behavior of the barometer in relation to the weather, but it remained for Vilhelm Bjerknes, a physics professor at Bergen, Norway, around 1900 to formulate weather systems mathematically in terms of high- and low-pressure areas, warm fronts, and cold fronts. In England, Napier Shaw began scientific research on atmospheric processes in 1885 at the Cavendish Laboratory, by 1918 weather forecasting had become a science, much as we know it today. So on. As well as the seasonal changes from summer to winter. The prevailing weather at a given location is called its climate, and climate varies with geographical latitude, terrain features, and altitude.
Keywords
Atmosphere, Atmospheric Composition, Radiation, Ionosphere, Magnetosphere, Weather
To cite this article
Mohamed Habib Ahmed Elkanzi, Abdelnabi Ali Elamin, Application of Atomic and Molecular Physics in the Atmosphere, American Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics. Vol. 4, No. 6, 2016, pp. 89-92. doi: 10.11648/j.ajaa.20160406.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
Astrophysical Journal, published by the University of Chicago Press, Chicago. III.
[2]
Aastrophysical and Space, published by Reidel Published Dordrecht, The Netherlands.
[3]
Astronomy and Astrophysical by Springer- Verlag. Berlin. Manthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, published by Biackwell Scicentific Publications. Oxford. England.
[4]
N. Asheroft and D. Mermin, Solid Statr Physics, Hoit Rinehart & Winston. New York 1976.
[5]
F. Seitz. Modern Theory of Solids McGraw-Hill, New York, 1940.
[6]
R. A Anthes, H. A. Panofsky. J. J Cahir, and A. Rango, the At mosphere. Merrill Publishing Co. New York, 1978.
[7]
J. T. Houghton, The Physics of Astmospheres, 2nded. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1986.
[8]
T. E. Graedel and P. J. Crutzen, Atmospheric Change: An Earth System Perspective (W. H. Freeman, New York, 1993): J. Houghton, Global Warming: The Complete Brefing (Lion Publishing Oxford, 1994).
[9]
R. G. Roble, in Encyclopedia of Applied physics (VCH Publishing, Oxford, 1994), Vol, 2, pp, 201-224.
[10]
Peter, B. L. Air composition and Chemistry. London 2011, Cambridge University Press.
[11]
Steven, A. A., Meteorology Understanding the Atmosphere, USA 2008, Thomson Brook lcole.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
548 FASHION AVENUE
NEW YORK, NY 10018
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-688-8931