Effectiveness of Mass Rabies Dog Vaccination Campaign in Communes V and VI of the Bamako-Mali, District
International Journal of Animal Science and Technology
Volume 3, Issue 2, June 2019, Pages: 37-41
Received: Jun. 20, 2019; Accepted: Jul. 22, 2019; Published: Aug. 6, 2019
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Authors
Ibrahim Sow, Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences & Techniques, University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies, Bamako, Mali; Diagnosis and Research Service, Central Veterinary Laboratory, Bamako, Mali
Yaya Sidi Koné, Diagnosis and Research Service, Central Veterinary Laboratory, Bamako, Mali
Kadiatou Coulibaly, Diagnosis and Research Service, Central Veterinary Laboratory, Bamako, Mali
Marthin Dakouo, Diagnosis and Research Service, Central Veterinary Laboratory, Bamako, Mali
Satigui Sidibé, Diagnosis and Research Service, Central Veterinary Laboratory, Bamako, Mali
Amadou Hamadoun Babana, Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences & Techniques, University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies, Bamako, Mali
Hamadoun Babana, Diagnosis and Research Service, Central Veterinary Laboratory, Bamako, Mali
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Abstract
Canine rabies remains an important public health problem in Africa. Mass vaccination of dogs is the recommended method for the control and elimination of rabies. We report the second free mass vaccination campaign of the dog in the communes V and VI of the district of Bamako that took place in September 2014. The objective was to estimate vaccination coverage by evaluating the effectiveness of the vaccination campaign and to determine the effectiveness parameters of the intervention by the capture mark recapture method and the Bayesian model. In commune V, vaccination coverage was 27% with a canine population estimated at 1531 and the proportion of dogs without owners was 2%. For commune VI, the canine population was estimated at 3510 with a vaccination coverage of 20%. The proportion of the non-owner dog population was 8%. The final effectiveness was 33% and 28% respectively in communes V and VI. Availability has been identified as the most sensitive effectiveness parameter attributed to the lack of campaign information. Despite low immunization coverage, it is possible to carry out vaccination campaigns that had an impact in Bamako district. For higher immunization coverage, a vaccination strategy adapted locally, perhaps, through a combination of fixed-line immunization and door-to-door vaccination.
Keywords
Vaccination Campaign, Canine Rabies, Bamako District, Efficacy
To cite this article
Ibrahim Sow, Yaya Sidi Koné, Kadiatou Coulibaly, Marthin Dakouo, Satigui Sidibé, Amadou Hamadoun Babana, Hamadoun Babana, Effectiveness of Mass Rabies Dog Vaccination Campaign in Communes V and VI of the Bamako-Mali, District, International Journal of Animal Science and Technology. Vol. 3, No. 2, 2019, pp. 37-41. doi: 10.11648/j.ijast.20190302.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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