Minimum Acceptable Diet and Factor Associated with It Among Infant and Young Children Age 6-23 Months in North Shoa, Oromia Region, Ethiopia
International Journal of Homeopathy & Natural Medicines
Volume 5, Issue 1, June 2019, Pages: 1-7
Received: Jan. 24, 2019; Accepted: Mar. 7, 2019; Published: Mar. 21, 2019
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Authors
Getu Gizaw, Department of Population and Family Health, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Gudina Tesfaye, Department of Medicine and Health, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Appropriate complementary feeding Practice is essential in the first two years of life for satisfactory growth and development of children and for prevention of childhood illness. Insufficient quantities, frequency and inadequate quality of complementary foods have a detrimental effect on health and growth in this critical period. The aim of this study was to assess minimum dietary diversity and meal frequency practice and determinants among infant and young children age between 6 and 23 months in Shoa, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Institution-based cross-sectional study was carried out to select 200 mothers/caregivers with 6–23 months of children reside in Sheno health center from July 25 to August 25, 2017. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to gather information on socio-demographic, child feeding practices and health-related characteristics. Data were entered to Epi-Data version 3.02 and transported to SPSS version 21 for further analysis. Binary logistic regression was used to see the association between the outcome variables and explanatory variables, and multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of minimum acceptable diet. The study revealed that the percentage of 6–23 months of children who meet the recommended level of minimum dietary diversity and meal frequency were 45 and 33%, respectively. Proportion of children who received composite indictor minimum acceptable diet was only 13.3%. Mothers/caregivers who had postnatal care visit, having good knowledge about child feeding practice, getting media exposure and mothers who had growth monitoring follow up were positively associated with minimum acceptable diet. Even though the study showed better progress as compared to the national prevalence of complementary feeding practices, child feeding practices in the study area were inadequate and not achieving national and WHO infant and young child feeding recommendations. Strengthening the available strategies and creating new intervention measures to improve maternal and child health services and giving behavioral change communication on child feeding practice using local media are compulsory actions for the government and policymakers.
Keywords
Dietary Diversity, Meal Frequency, 6–23 Months of Children, Northern Ethiopia
To cite this article
Getu Gizaw, Gudina Tesfaye, Minimum Acceptable Diet and Factor Associated with It Among Infant and Young Children Age 6-23 Months in North Shoa, Oromia Region, Ethiopia, International Journal of Homeopathy & Natural Medicines. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2019, pp. 1-7. doi: 10.11648/j.ijhnm.20190501.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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