Social Media: An Ideal Tool for Public Participation to Promote Deliberative Democracy —— The Case of Public Participation in Refugee Crisis
Advances in Sciences and Humanities
Volume 2, Issue 6, December 2016, Pages: 70-75
Received: Sep. 5, 2016; Accepted: Nov. 16, 2016; Published: Oct. 18, 2017
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Author
Chuangying Li, Department of Media and Communication, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
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Abstract
On social media, the images of a drowned child on the beach continue to spark public’s sympathy toward refugees and evoke international outcry over the governments’ inability to adequately address the refugee crisis. These photos and refugee crisis can be seen as catalysts that have promoted the chain of political events. It has promoted civic engagement and inspired people to participate in this event. By analyzing this case, we can see the relationships between social media, public participation and deliberative democracy quite clearly; analyze why social media is an ideal tool for public participation; discover how powerful voluntary participation is; explore how the level of citizen participation varied during this process; and understand how public participation promote deliberative democracy by social media comprehensively.
Keywords
Social Media, Public Participation, Deliberative Democracy, Refugee Crisis
To cite this article
Chuangying Li, Social Media: An Ideal Tool for Public Participation to Promote Deliberative Democracy —— The Case of Public Participation in Refugee Crisis, Advances in Sciences and Humanities. Vol. 2, No. 6, 2016, pp. 70-75. doi: 10.11648/j.ash.20160206.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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