Frequency and Correlates of Obesity or Overweight Among Patients with Hypertension at the Ignace Deen National Hospital in Conakry, Guinea
Central African Journal of Public Health
Volume 4, Issue 6, December 2018, Pages: 185-190
Received: Oct. 29, 2018; Accepted: Nov. 12, 2018; Published: Dec. 26, 2018
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Authors
Sidibé Sidikiba, Maferinyah National Centre for Training and Research in Rural Health, Forécariah, Guinea; Faculty of Health Sciences and Techniques, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
Barry Ibrahima Sory, Department of Cardiology, Ignace Deen National Hospital, Conakry, Guinea
Camara Bienvenu Salim, Maferinyah National Centre for Training and Research in Rural Health, Forécariah, Guinea; Faculty of Health Sciences and Techniques, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
Sylla Djenabou, Faculty of Health Sciences and Techniques, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
Samaké Amara Tabaouo, Faculty of Health Sciences and Techniques, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
Kuotu Gérard Christian, Faculty of Health Sciences and Techniques, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
Camara Gnoume, Faculty of Health Sciences and Techniques, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
Delamou Alexandre, Maferinyah National Centre for Training and Research in Rural Health, Forécariah, Guinea; Faculty of Health Sciences and Techniques, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
Balde Mamadou Dadhi, Faculty of Health Sciences and Techniques, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
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Abstract
Hypertension and obesity are common life style diseases with increasing burden in worldwide. The objective of this study was to describe the frequency and identify factors associated with obesity or overweight among patients with hypertension seeking care at the department of cardiology of Ignace Deen national hospital in Conakry, Guinea. This was a periodic cross-sectional study from May 1 to July 31, 2017. The majority of the patients was obese (36.22%) or over weighted (33.86%). The multiple logistic regression showed that sex and education level of patients were independently associated with obesity or overweight. Female patients were two times more likely to be obese or over weighted than male patients [Adjusted Odd Ratio (AOR): 2.14; 95% confidence interval (C.I): 1. 1.36-3.36]. Patients with at least primary school level were 47% less likely to be obese or over weighted than patients who had not attended school (AOR: 0.53; 95%C.I: 0.35-0.82). Even though this was not statistically significant, patients who were following a diet recommended by a care provider 43% less likely to be obese or over weighted. Particular medical follow up on and regular counseiling about life style for female patients living with hypertension would be relevant during clinical practices.
Keywords
Hypertension, Obesity, Overweight, Nutrition, Guinea
To cite this article
Sidibé Sidikiba, Barry Ibrahima Sory, Camara Bienvenu Salim, Sylla Djenabou, Samaké Amara Tabaouo, Kuotu Gérard Christian, Camara Gnoume, Delamou Alexandre, Balde Mamadou Dadhi, Frequency and Correlates of Obesity or Overweight Among Patients with Hypertension at the Ignace Deen National Hospital in Conakry, Guinea, Central African Journal of Public Health. Vol. 4, No. 6, 2018, pp. 185-190. doi: 10.11648/j.cajph.20180406.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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