Perception and Willingness to Adopt a Child Among Women Attending the Infertility Clinic in a Rural Tertiary Hospital in South-South Nigeria
Central African Journal of Public Health
Volume 5, Issue 3, June 2019, Pages: 102-108
Received: Oct. 8, 2018; Accepted: Mar. 11, 2019; Published: Apr. 2, 2019
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Authors
Emmanuel Friday Osagiede, Department of Community Medicine, Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua, Nigeria
Oziegbe Pierre Okukpon, Department of Community Medicine, Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua, Nigeria
Ese Tracy Abhulimhen, Department of Community Health and Primary Health Care, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria; Department of Accident and Emergency, Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua, Nigeria
Eugene Ikhide Erah, Department of Community Health and Primary Health Care, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria
Valentine Abumere Enereba, Department of Community Health and Primary Health Care, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria
Monday Osaro Osagiede, Department of Family Law, Faculty of Law, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria
Victor Oyelola Moody, Department of Community Medicine, Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua, Nigeria
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Abstract
Background: Child adoption is the legal process carried out through an open statutory or customary laws of creating a parent-child relationship between persons who are not related by blood thereby making the adopted child have equal rights, privileges, and inheritance as the biological children of the adoptive parents. Aims and Objectives: To assess the perception, attitude and willingness to adopt children among women attending infertility clinic in Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua, with the aim of providing information on adoption as a possible panacea to infertility management. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua, Edo State Nigeria. One hundred and thirty-four (134) women attending the infertility clinic at this facility were recruited through a systematic random sampling technique and interviewed using structured pre-tested questionnaires. The data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20 and presented as charts, tables, and associations tested with Chi-square. Results: All of the respondents had heard of adoption, of which 91.8% knew the correct meaning of child adoption. Despite good knowledge of the meaning of adoption, only 38.1% of respondents knew what the process of adoption entails. Attitude towards child adoption was predominantly positive (73.1%). Despite the predominantly high awareness and positive attitude for child adoption, the willingness to adopt was incongruously low. Conclusion: Willingness to adopt children among these infertile women is quite low despite good knowledge and positive attitude. Acceptability and more importantly, actual follow-through with the process of child adoption is still a core issue requiring a multi-prong approach among many childless women in developing countries.
Keywords
Perception, Willingness, Child Adoption, Women, Infertility Clinic, Nigeria
To cite this article
Emmanuel Friday Osagiede, Oziegbe Pierre Okukpon, Ese Tracy Abhulimhen, Eugene Ikhide Erah, Valentine Abumere Enereba, Monday Osaro Osagiede, Victor Oyelola Moody, Perception and Willingness to Adopt a Child Among Women Attending the Infertility Clinic in a Rural Tertiary Hospital in South-South Nigeria, Central African Journal of Public Health. Vol. 5, No. 3, 2019, pp. 102-108. doi: 10.11648/j.cajph.20190503.11
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Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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