Analyzing the Effects of the Ebola Virus Disease Outbreak on Maternal and Child Health Services in the Health District of Beyla, Guinea
Central African Journal of Public Health
Volume 5, Issue 4, August 2019, Pages: 136-141
Received: Apr. 8, 2019; Accepted: May 29, 2019; Published: Jun. 12, 2019
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Authors
Karifa Kourouma, Research Unit, National Training and Research Centre in rural Health of Maferinyah, Forecariah, Guinea
Bienvenu Salim Camara, Research Unit, National Training and Research Centre in rural Health of Maferinyah, Forecariah, Guinea
Delphin Kolie, Research Unit, National Training and Research Centre in rural Health of Maferinyah, Forecariah, Guinea
Sidikiba Sidibé, Research Unit, National Training and Research Centre in rural Health of Maferinyah, Forecariah, Guinea; Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technique, University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
Abdoul Habib Beavogui, Research Unit, National Training and Research Centre in rural Health of Maferinyah, Forecariah, Guinea
Alexandre Delamou, Research Unit, National Training and Research Centre in rural Health of Maferinyah, Forecariah, Guinea; Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technique, University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
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Abstract
While more efforts were needed to enhance maternal and child health services in Guinea, the country experienced the worst and longest Ebola virus disease outbreak in 2014. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of the 2014 Ebola virus disease outbreak on antenatal care visits, institutional deliveries and vaccine coverage among children aged 0 to 11 months in the health district of Beyla in Guinea. This was an ecological study based on aggregated data from the public health facilities of the district health of Beyla, that covered three distinct periods related to the Ebola virus disease outbreak: pre-Ebola (February 1st 2013 to January 31st 2014), intra-Ebola (February 1st 2014 to January 31st 2015) and post-Ebola (February 1st 2015 to December 31st 2015). Antenatal care visits, institutional deliveries and vaccination coverage of children aged 0 to 11 months significantly decreased during the intra and post-Ebola periods. The average of antenatal care visits (third visit or more) declined from 123% (pre-Ebola period) to 85% and 65% during the intra and post-Ebola periods respectively. Institutional deliveries declined from 40% to 35% then to 30% respectively (p < 0.001). Also, the average of vaccination coverage declined from 86% to 65% then to 56% respectively for BCG (p < 0.001), from 90% to 50% then to 52% for Pentavalent-3 (p < 0.001), and from 84% to 33% then to 48% for Oral Polio vaccine (third dose) (p < 0.001). Ebola virus disease outbreak led to persistent decrease in antenatal care visits, institutional deliveries and vaccination coverages among children aged 0 to 11 months in the district health of Beyla intra and post Ebola outbreak. Further studies, using qualitative research methods, that explore perceptions of communities and women will better guide health response during outbreak, strengthen health systems and prevent future Ebola outbreak in Guinea.
Keywords
Ebola, Antenatal Care Visits, Institutional Deliveries, Vaccination, Guinea
To cite this article
Karifa Kourouma, Bienvenu Salim Camara, Delphin Kolie, Sidikiba Sidibé, Abdoul Habib Beavogui, Alexandre Delamou, Analyzing the Effects of the Ebola Virus Disease Outbreak on Maternal and Child Health Services in the Health District of Beyla, Guinea, Central African Journal of Public Health. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2019, pp. 136-141. doi: 10.11648/j.cajph.20190504.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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