Risk Factors of Anaemia Among Pregnant Women in Banyo Health District, Adamawa Region of Cameroon
Central African Journal of Public Health
Volume 5, Issue 5, October 2019, Pages: 221-226
Received: Aug. 19, 2019; Accepted: Sep. 16, 2019; Published: Oct. 9, 2019
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Authors
Caroline Teh Monteh, Division of the Operational Research in Health/Ministry of Public Health, Yaounde, Cameroon
Justin Ndié, Division of the Operational Research in Health/Ministry of Public Health, Yaounde, Cameroon
Joëlle Laure Sobngwi, School of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Central Africa, Yaounde, Cameroon
Benjamin Alexandre Nkoum, School of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Central Africa, Yaounde, Cameroon
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Abstract
Background: Anaemia in pregnant women remains a major preoccupation in the fight against maternal and infant mortality. It constitutes a sure materno-infantile morbidity and mortality risk, premature delivery and small weight births. Objective: This study was aimed at determining the risk factors of anaemia among pregnant women in the Banyo Health District in the Adamawa Region, Cameroun. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out for six weeks (September 17 to November 3, 2013) in 6 health facilities of the Banyo Health District. Included in this study were all pregnant woman received during prenatal consultation in the health facilities of the Banyo Health District who gave her consent to participate in the study. Data collection was done with the help of a questionnaire. A total of 297 pregnant women received during prenatal consultation in the 6 health facilities of the 5 health areas were chosen by the systematic consecutive sampling method. These women benefited from a haemoglobin test after a capillary blood draw was carried out which permitted a para-clinical evaluation of the anaemia. Data were analysed by Excel and SPSS 22 softwares. Results: The results showed that the mean haemoglobin rate was of 10.8±1.89 g/dl. 52.5% of pregnant women were anaemic amongst which 46% had mild anaemia, 48% had moderate anaemia and 6% had severe anaemia. 63% of the women with anaemia live in polygamous household and 55.7% do not wash their hands with soap after a meal. The prevalence of anaemia among pregnant women in the Banyo Health District was associate with the consumption of kaolin (OR=1.9 [1.1-3.9] p=0.049), irregular iron supplement intake (OR=2.9 [1.4-5.9] p=0.014) and the number of meal consumed per day less than or equal to 2 (OR=2.81 [2.13-5.9] p=0.007). On the other hand, regular fruit consumption (OR=0.28 [0.11-0.74] p=0.011), sound knowledge of the causes (OR=0.36 [0.19-0.68] p=0.002) and the consequences (OR=0.35 [0.19-0.7] p=0.003) of anaemia were significantly associated with lesser risk of anaemia among the pregnant women. Conclusion: The high prevalence of anaemia among pregnant women in the Banyo Health District remains a preoccupying health problem. It demonstrates the need of a global action in resolution of this public health problem. As such, there is a need to mobilize a preventive strategy with emphasis on sensitization, nutritional and health education. In addition, maternal systematic iron supplementation from the second trimester of pregnancy remains an imperative.
Keywords
Anemia, Risk Factors, Pregnant Woman, Banyo Health District, Adamawa Region
To cite this article
Caroline Teh Monteh, Justin Ndié, Joëlle Laure Sobngwi, Benjamin Alexandre Nkoum, Risk Factors of Anaemia Among Pregnant Women in Banyo Health District, Adamawa Region of Cameroon, Central African Journal of Public Health. Vol. 5, No. 5, 2019, pp. 221-226. doi: 10.11648/j.cajph.20190505.17
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This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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