Determinants of Neonatal Mortality in the Health Districts of Labe, Mamou, Faranah and Kankan
Central African Journal of Public Health
Volume 5, Issue 6, December 2019, Pages: 246-251
Received: Sep. 5, 2019; Accepted: Sep. 24, 2019; Published: Oct. 10, 2019
Views 50      Downloads 8
Authors
Diallo Ibrahima Sory, Department of Neonatology, Institute of Child Nutrition and Health, Conakry, Republic of Guinea
Diallo Sory, Department of Neonatology, Institute of Child Nutrition and Health, Conakry, Republic of Guinea
Camara Yero Boye, Strategy and Development Office, Ministry of Health, Conakry, Republic of Guinea
Diallo Thierno Saïdou, National HIV Programme, Ministry of Health, Conakry, Republic of Guinea
Conte N’faly, Department of Neonatology, Institute of Child Nutrition and Health, Conakry, Republic of Guinea
Koulibaly Mamadou Korka, Department of Neonatology, Institute of Child Nutrition and Health, Conakry, Republic of Guinea
Cisse Moussa, Department of Neonatology, Institute of Child Nutrition and Health, Conakry, Republic of Guinea
Kaba Djèney Fadima, Strategy and Development Office, Ministry of Health, Conakry, Republic of Guinea
Daffe Mamadi, Food and Nutrition Division, Ministry of Health, Conakry, Republic of Guinea
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
Neonatal mortality is still a real public health problem in Guinea. Indeed, despite the remarkable progress made in the country, neonatal mortality is still high: 20 per 1000 live births (1). Regional disparities are significant, with the regions of Mamou (32‰), Faranah (28‰), Labé (26‰) and Kankan (26‰) being the most affected. Objective: To determine the main factors related to neonatal deaths in the Faranah, Mamou, Labé and Kankan regions. This is a descriptive qualitative study that examines the perspectives of health service users, local decision-makers and providers on the causes of neonatal mortality in the Labé, Mamou, Faranah and Kankan regions. The main direct medical causes of neonatal mortality cited by participants were: prematurity, neonatal infections, low birth weight, hypoglycemia, hemorrhagic diseases of the newborn. This workshop concluded that neonatal mortality depends on a multitude of economic, political, socio-cultural and health factors, all of which endanger the lives of newborns.
Keywords
Neonatal Mortality, Determinants, Health District
To cite this article
Diallo Ibrahima Sory, Diallo Sory, Camara Yero Boye, Diallo Thierno Saïdou, Conte N’faly, Koulibaly Mamadou Korka, Cisse Moussa, Kaba Djèney Fadima, Daffe Mamadi, Determinants of Neonatal Mortality in the Health Districts of Labe, Mamou, Faranah and Kankan, Central African Journal of Public Health. Vol. 5, No. 6, 2019, pp. 246-251. doi: 10.11648/j.cajph.20190506.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation. Third general population and housing census. RGPH3, 2014.
[2]
Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation. Demographic and Health Survey 2016.
[3]
Ministry of Health, Human Resources for Health Situation Analysis, July 2012.
[4]
Ministry of Health, SONU Evaluation, 2017.
[5]
P. Sauvegrain, R. Rico-berrocal, J. Zeitlin. What are the causes of high perinatal and infant mortality in Seine-Saint-Denis? Consultation of the department's professionals through a Delphi process. J Gynecol obstetr Biol Reprod 2016.
[6]
Pilkington H, Blondel B, Papiernik E, Cuttini M, Charreire H, Maier RF, et al. Distribution of maternity service unit and risk of fetal and neonatal mortality in France. Eur J Publ Health 2014.
[7]
Combier E, Charreire H, Le Vaillant H, Michaut F, Ferdynus C, Amat-Rose JM, et al Perinatal anequalities and accessibility of maternity service in a rural French region: closing maternity units in Burgundy. Health Place 2013; 24: 225-3.
[8]
World Health Organization, A Healthy Environment for Healthy Children: Key Messages for Concrete Action, 2010.
[9]
Patricia Fischer-Ghanassia, E. Ghanassia. Endocrinology-Nutrition. Vernazobres-Grego 6th Edition (2012), p 458-459. ISBN: 978-2-8183-0367-2.
[10]
National Institute of Statistics. Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS, 2016), Final Report, Conakry, Guinea.
[11]
Demographic and health indicators for the Eastern Mediterranean 2006. Cairo, WHO Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean, 2006.
[12]
Ngayawanaka, I. P. Influence of maternal socio-economic status on neonatal mortality trends, by region, Cameroon, 2012.
[13]
Akoto, M. E. Infant mortality in Africa: level and characteristics, causes and determinants, CIACO, 1985.
[14]
Barry, B. Maternal Mortality in Bakel Department: Causes and Favourable Factors Determined by the Verbal Autopsy, Master's thesis on Research, 2008.
[15]
WHO, Maternal Mortality: Removing women from the deadly spiral. WHO Chronicle, 40 (5), page 193-202, 1986.
[16]
Dicko-Traoré, F., Sylla, M., Traoré, Y., Traoré, A., Diall, H., Diakité. National reference neonatology unit in Mali: state of play. Public Health 2014; 26 (1), 115-121.
[17]
Katamea T, Mukuku O, Kamona L, Mukelenge K, Mbula O, Baledi L, et al. Mortality risk factors in newborns transferred to the neonatal unit at Jason Sendwe Hospital in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo. Pan African Medical Journal. 2014; 19: 169.a
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186