Geographical Distribution of HIV-patients with Respect to HIV-treatment Units in Cameroon: A Cross-sectional Study
International Journal of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Education and Behavioural Science
Volume 5, Issue 1, June 2019, Pages: 59-67
Received: Mar. 20, 2019; Accepted: Apr. 25, 2019; Published: May 20, 2019
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Authors
André Pascal Goura, Meilleur Accès aux Soins de Santé, Yaoundé, Cameroon
Benjamin Azike Chukuwchindun, Meilleur Accès aux Soins de Santé, Kousseri, Cameroon
Martin Ndinakie Yakum, Meilleur Accès aux Soins de Santé, Yaoundé, Cameroon
Joliette Azakoh Nguefack, Meilleur Accès aux Soins de Santé, Douala, Cameroon
Paméla Ekeme Lonbe, Department of Law and Political Sciences, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon
Jérôme Ateudjieu, Meilleur Accès aux Soins de Santé, Yaoundé, Cameroon; Division of Health Operational Research, Cameroon Ministry of Public Health, Yaoundé, Cameroon; Faculty of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Public Health, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon
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Abstract
The treatment of HIV-patients is a key component to HIV/aids control strategies. Since 2007, Cameroon is treating HIV-patients for free within decentralized treatment units created in functional health districts. This study aimed to map the geographical distribution of HIV-patients with respect to that of treatment units in Cameroon. We conducted a cross-sectional study in which functional health districts with HIV-treatment units were exhaustively sampled to map the local access to antiretroviral care in the Cameroon West region. Patients from these units were randomly selected and recruited during their monthly period of receiving antiretroviral drugs. Four hundred and seventy-two patients were included. The mean age of participants was 42 (± 10) years with a sex ratio male/female of 1/3. Fourteen units were distributed in 09 health districts (45% coverage) and 11/20 districts had no Treatment unit. Sixty two percent (294/472) of participants resided in the health district of their screening and 65% (308/472) were follow up in the health district of residence. Nine of ten patients resided in their treatment health region. Less than 10% of patients travel from health districts with no HIV-treatment unit. Close to 1/5 (74/382) patient migrated from local health district with treatment unit to another local health district for follow up. Second line treatment was not available except in one public and one private treatment unit. The distribution of HIV-treatment units is strongly linked to the geographical distribution of HIV-patients across health districts. We therefore believe that the creation of treatment units in health districts still lacking them can significantly increase screening and treatment of patients in this region.
Keywords
Distribution, Residence, HIV-treatment Unit, Health District, West-Cameroon
To cite this article
André Pascal Goura, Benjamin Azike Chukuwchindun, Martin Ndinakie Yakum, Joliette Azakoh Nguefack, Paméla Ekeme Lonbe, Jérôme Ateudjieu, Geographical Distribution of HIV-patients with Respect to HIV-treatment Units in Cameroon: A Cross-sectional Study, International Journal of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Education and Behavioural Science. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2019, pp. 59-67. doi: 10.11648/j.ijhpebs.20190501.18
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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