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The Magnitude of Adherence Diabetic Patients Toward Their Anti-diabetic Medication and Associated Factors in Asmara, Eritrea
Journal of Drug Design and Medicinal Chemistry
Volume 6, Issue 4, December 2020, Pages: 39-39
Received: Aug. 29, 2020; Accepted: Sep. 16, 2020; Published: Dec. 16, 2020
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Authors
Daniel Tikue Asrat, Department of Nursing and Public Health, Asmara College of Health Sciences, Asmara, Eritrea
Robiel Ankeste, Department of Nursing and Public Health, Asmara College of Health Sciences, Asmara, Eritrea
Amanuel Tesfit, Department of Nursing and Public Health, Asmara College of Health Sciences, Asmara, Eritrea
Naod Fsseha, Department of Nursing and Public Health, Asmara College of Health Sciences, Asmara, Eritrea
Luwam Russom, Department of Nursing and Public Health, Asmara College of Health Sciences, Asmara, Eritrea
Ghirmay Yohannes, Department of Nursing and Public Health, Asmara College of Health Sciences, Asmara, Eritrea
Frezghi Hidray, Department of Nursing and Public Health, Asmara College of Health Sciences, Asmara, Eritrea
Hager Tesfaselassie, Department of Nursing and Public Health, Asmara College of Health Sciences, Asmara, Eritrea
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Abstract
Diabetes mellitus is a growing global health problem that affects individuals of all ages. Anti-diabetic medications are integral for glycemic control in diabetes. Lack of adherence to drugs can alter blood glucose levels and can lead to treatment failure, accelerated development of complications, and increased morbidity, mortality, and disability. In Eritrea, adherence to anti-diabetic medication is not well studied so far. The study aimed to assess the magnitude of adherence of diabetic patients toward their anti-diabetes medication and associated factors in the diabetic clinic of Halibut National Referral Hospital. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in Asmara Halibet National Referral Hospital diabetic clinic from February 01 to May 31, 2019. Subjects of the study were all diabetic patients 16 years and above and had been on diabetic treatment for not less than six months. The sample size of this study was 205 determined using Crecy & Morgan formula and convenience non-probability sampling was used to select study participants. Data were collected through an interview questionnaire assessed using self-report which then, cleaned, coded, and entered to excel and exported to SPSS for Windows version 20.0. Descriptive and inferential statistics were done to determine adherence to anti-diabetic medication and the associated factors. A total of 205 study participants were interviewed with a response rate of 100%. The level of adherence was found to be 86.3%. Factors found to be significantly associated with anti-diabetes medication were duration of diabetes (P-value=0.001), Health education about DM and its medications (P-value=0.004), taking multiple medication (P-Value=0.018), forgetfulness (P-value=0.000), and monitoring of blood glucose level (p-value=0.06). In conclusion, the majority of respondents 86.3% in this study were found to be adherent to their anti-diabetic medications. Strategies that further improves anti-diabetic drug availability, provide health education, reduce the intervals of visits for follow-ups on diabetic care, and giving explicit information and persistent close family support for those taking multiple medications may help in improving adherence levels among patients with diabetes.
Keywords
Diabetes Mellitus, Adherence, Patients
To cite this article
Daniel Tikue Asrat, Robiel Ankeste, Amanuel Tesfit, Naod Fsseha, Luwam Russom, Ghirmay Yohannes, Frezghi Hidray, Hager Tesfaselassie, The Magnitude of Adherence Diabetic Patients Toward Their Anti-diabetic Medication and Associated Factors in Asmara, Eritrea, Journal of Drug Design and Medicinal Chemistry. Vol. 6, No. 4, 2020, pp. 39-39. doi: 10.11648/j.jddmc.20200604.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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