D-dimer Increasing After First Alemtuzumab Administration in a Multiple Sclerosis Patient
International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medical Sciences
Volume 5, Issue 5, September 2019, Pages: 67-69
Received: Aug. 19, 2019; Accepted: Sep. 4, 2019; Published: Oct. 11, 2019
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Authors
Stefania Federica De Mercanti, Clinical and Biological Sciences Department, University of Torino, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Neurology Unit, Orbassano, Italy
Simona Rolla, Clinical and Biological Sciences Department, University of Torino, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Neurology Unit, Orbassano, Italy
Manuela Matta, Clinical and Biological Sciences Department, University of Torino, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Neurology Unit, Orbassano, Italy
Marco Iudicello, Clinical and Biological Sciences Department, University of Torino, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Neurology Unit, Orbassano, Italy
Emanuele Franchin, Clinical and Biological Sciences Department, University of Torino, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Neurology Unit, Orbassano, Italy
Marinella Clerico, Clinical and Biological Sciences Department, University of Torino, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Neurology Unit, Orbassano, Italy
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Abstract
Alemtuzumab is a humanized anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody used for the treatment of high activity relapsing multiple sclerosis (R-MS). The most common adverse event is an infusion reaction due to cytokine-release. Autoimmunity can arise from months to years after treatment and encompasses Grave’s disease and thrombocytopenia. Recent reports of stroke, heart attack, and arterial dissection after alemtuzumab administration, in some cases within hours of infusion, led the European Medicines Agency’s (EMA's) Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) to a safety review of treatment with alemtuzumab. We report a D-Dimer increasing with suspected associated pulmonary embolism in an RMS patient after the first alemtuzumab administration. D-dimer test is not mandatory after alemtuzumab treatment, but its possible increase should warn the physician to select the patients with lower cardiovascular and thrombosis risk.
Keywords
Multiple Sclerosis, Alemtuzumab, D-Dimer, Interleukin 6, Thrombosis, Biomarker, Manuscript
To cite this article
Stefania Federica De Mercanti, Simona Rolla, Manuela Matta, Marco Iudicello, Emanuele Franchin, Marinella Clerico, D-dimer Increasing After First Alemtuzumab Administration in a Multiple Sclerosis Patient, International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medical Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 5, 2019, pp. 67-69. doi: 10.11648/j.ijcems.20190505.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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