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Identification and Pathogenic Potential of Orofacial Herpetic Clinical Isolates in Northeast Mexico
International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medical Sciences
Volume 6, Issue 5, September 2020, Pages: 91-95
Received: Sep. 18, 2020; Accepted: Oct. 5, 2020; Published: Oct. 13, 2020
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Authors
Cynthia Mendoza-Rodriguez, Dermatology Service, Faculty of Medicine and Dr. Jose Eleuterio Gonzalez University Hospital, Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon, Nuevo León, Mexico
Jorge Ocampo-Candiani, Dermatology Service, Faculty of Medicine and Dr. Jose Eleuterio Gonzalez University Hospital, Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon, Nuevo León, Mexico
Pilar Morales-San Claudio, Microbiology Department, Center of Specialized Laboratories, Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon, Mexico
Osvaldo Vazquez-Martinez, Dermatology Service, Faculty of Medicine and Dr. Jose Eleuterio Gonzalez University Hospital, Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon, Nuevo León, Mexico
Mauricio Salinas-Santander, Research Department, Faculty of Medicine, Autonomous University of Coahuila, Saltillo Coahuila, Mexico
Ernesto Torres-Lopez, Immunovirology Laboratory, Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon, Mexico
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Abstract
Background Herpes simplex viruses 1 (human herpes virus types 1, HSV-1) often cause recurrent infections that affect the skin, mouth, lips, and eyes and eventually induce herpetic encephalitis. A high percentage of the population is infected with HSV-1 in which it produces a variety of these orofacial disease. In Mexico, there are no studies to determine the effects of viral virulence of clinical facial dermal isolates of active infections caused by the Herpes simplex virus 1. Objective of this work was to compare the herpetic activity of human clinical isolates from northeast Mexico against HSV-1 KOS as reference strain, which induces experimental murine model keratitis disease produced by infecting mouse corneas. Methods and Materials we compared several clinical isolate of HSV-1 obtained from 25 patients diagnosed with HSV-1 active, according to acyclovir (ACV) susceptibility, thymidine kinase (TK) polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and experimental Balb/c mice model as viral infections in vivo were evaluated. Results we found that several clinical isolates showed ACV resistance (48%) and pathogenic potential (PP) differences that caused ocular infection more or less than reference HSV-1 KOS strain. In Conclusion, some clinical isolate from northeast Mexico shown differences that caused ocular infection more or less than reference HSV-1 KOS strain.
Keywords
Herpes Simplex Virus, Virulence, Experimental Model, Clinical Isolates, Acyclovir, Northeast Mexico
To cite this article
Cynthia Mendoza-Rodriguez, Jorge Ocampo-Candiani, Pilar Morales-San Claudio, Osvaldo Vazquez-Martinez, Mauricio Salinas-Santander, Ernesto Torres-Lopez, Identification and Pathogenic Potential of Orofacial Herpetic Clinical Isolates in Northeast Mexico, International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medical Sciences. Vol. 6, No. 5, 2020, pp. 91-95. doi: 10.11648/j.ijcems.20200605.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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