The Arabic Origins of English and Indo-European "Legal Terms": A Radical Linguistic Theory Approach
International Journal of Applied Linguistics and Translation
Volume 1, Issue 3, August 2015, Pages: 35-49
Received: Jun. 8, 2015; Accepted: Jun. 24, 2015; Published: Jul. 1, 2015
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Author
Zaidan Ali Jassem, Department of English Language and Translation, Qassim University, Buraidah, KSA
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Abstract
This paper aims to trace the Arabic origins of English, German, French, Latin, Greek, and Sanskrit "legal terms" from a radical linguistic (or lexical root) theory perspective. The data comprises 150 such terms like allow, barrister, criminal/juvenile court, law, legal, Lord Chancellor, judge, justice, fair, penal/disciplinary code, permit, prosecutor general, prohibit, regulation, ruling, solicitor, swear, testify, violation, witness, and so on. The results show clearly that all such words have true Arabic cognates, which have the same or similar forms and meanings, with their differences being due to natural and plausible causes and different routes of linguistic change. Moreover, the results support the adequacy of the radical linguistic theory according to which, unlike the Comparative Method and/or Family Tree Model, Arabic, English, German, French, Latin, Greek, and Sanskrit are dialects of the same language or family, now renamed Eurabian or Urban family, with Arabic being their origin all for sharing the whole cognates with them and for its huge phonetic, morphological, grammatical, and lexical variety and wealth. Also, they indicate that there is a radical language from which all human languages stemmed and which has been preserved almost intact in Arabic as the most conservative and productive language, without which it is impossible to interpret its linguistic richness, versatility, fertility on all levels.
Keywords
Legal Terms, Arabic, English, German, French, Latin, Greek, Sanskrit, Historical Linguistics, Radical Linguistic (Lexical Root) Theory, Language Relationships
To cite this article
Zaidan Ali Jassem, The Arabic Origins of English and Indo-European "Legal Terms": A Radical Linguistic Theory Approach, International Journal of Applied Linguistics and Translation. Vol. 1, No. 3, 2015, pp. 35-49. doi: 10.11648/j.ijalt.20150103.11
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