The Effect of Drought on Lignin Content and Digestibility of Tifton-85 and Coastal Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.) Hays Produced in Georgia
International Journal of Applied Agricultural Sciences
Volume 2, Issue 4, July 2016, Pages: 69-74
Received: Mar. 2, 2016; Accepted: Mar. 29, 2016; Published: Jul. 5, 2016
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Authors
Uttam Saha, Agricultural and Environmental Services Laboratories, the University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA
Dennis Hancock, Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, the University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA
Lawton Stewart, Department of Animal and Dairy Sciences, the University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA
David Kissel, Agricultural and Environmental Services Laboratories, the University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA
Leticia Sonon, Agricultural and Environmental Services Laboratories, the University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA
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Abstract
Digestibility of “Tifton 85” Bermudagrass has been noted to be higher than most other Bermudagrass cultivars. However, the superior digestibility of Tifton-85 has not been verified based on samples from producers, nor is it known how water availability might affect this comparison. Recent past weather conditions in Georgia allowed this comparison. Much of Georgia was in severe drought in 2007 and 2008. In contrast, there was less/no drought in 2006 and 2009. In each of these years, producers submitted a substantial number of Tifton-85 and Coastal forage samples to our laboratory for lignin and “Digestible Neutral Detergent Fiber (dNDF48)” analyses. Over all years, Tifton-85 had lower lignin content than coastal. However, Tifton-85 had significantly lower lignin content only in drought free 2006 and 2009, whereas the lignin content of Coastal was unaffected by drought in 2007 and 2008. The lignin of Tifton-85 increased during these two drought years. Despite this, the dNDF48 for Tifton-85 was significantly higher than coastal in all four years, suggesting that drought had hardly any effect on the digestibility of Tifton-85. Apparently, the type of lignin in Tifton-85 is different from that in coastal. Higher dNDF48 for Tifton-85 has been attributed to its lower concentrations of ether-linked ferulic acid than in Coastal. Decreased ether bonding in lignin results in higher digestion.
Keywords
Bermudagrass, Coastal, Drought, Digestibility, Digestible Neutral Detergent Fiber Lignin Content, Tifton-85
To cite this article
Uttam Saha, Dennis Hancock, Lawton Stewart, David Kissel, Leticia Sonon, The Effect of Drought on Lignin Content and Digestibility of Tifton-85 and Coastal Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.) Hays Produced in Georgia, International Journal of Applied Agricultural Sciences. Vol. 2, No. 4, 2016, pp. 69-74. doi: 10.11648/j.ijaas.20160204.15
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Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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