Postharvest Treatment with Hydrogen Peroxide to Control Orange Fruit Decay Caused by Penicillum digitatum and Penicillum italicum
International Journal of Applied Agricultural Sciences
Volume 5, Issue 5, September 2019, Pages: 114-119
Received: Aug. 29, 2019; Accepted: Sep. 30, 2019; Published: Oct. 15, 2019
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Authors
Xiangchun Meng, Fruit Tree Research Institute, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Science, Key Laboratory of South Subtropical Fruit Biology and Genetic Resource Utilization, Ministry of Agriculture, Guangzhou, P. R. China
Zepeng Huang, Fruit Tree Research Institute, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Science, Key Laboratory of South Subtropical Fruit Biology and Genetic Resource Utilization, Ministry of Agriculture, Guangzhou, P. R. China
Chao Fan, Fruit Tree Research Institute, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Science, Key Laboratory of South Subtropical Fruit Biology and Genetic Resource Utilization, Ministry of Agriculture, Guangzhou, P. R. China
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Abstract
Imazalil and Thiabendazole chemical based fungicides are currently used to control citrus green/blue molds, which is mainly caused by P. digitatum and P. italicum. In order to find alternative methods for control of citrus fruit diseases to avoid fungicide caused health and environmental problems, current research was conducted to explore the antifungal effectiveness of H2O2-Ag+ (Hydrogen peroxide stabilized with silver ions), which is a universally applicable and high effective disinfectant against pathogenic microorganisms, and has been used to control postharvest decay of fresh fruits in most developed countries, in the context of in vitro and in vivo P. digitatum and P. italicum development in the Newhall navel orange. H2O2-Ag+ was found to be effective in inhibiting in vitro radial growth and in vivo inoculated lesion development of Penicillum italicum and Penicillum digitatum. Dipping fruit with H2O2 at concentrations of 1-2% before storage reduced the decay incidence of orange after 30 and 60 days cold storage following by 3 days shelf life, although it was less effective than the positive control of fungicide Imazalil (500ppm). H2O2 provided a disinfectant effect on the pericarp, as indicated by significant reduction of total bacterial, mold and yeast counts. After cold storage and shelf-life, no significant difference was found among all treatments in the total soluble solids (TSS), titratable acid (TA), while higher vitamin C content was found in the Imazalil treated fruit. This research suggest that H2O2 can be an alternative to chemical fungicides that, although more effective, pose problems due to their residue levels and health concerns, especially for the organic fruit industry.
Keywords
Antifungal, Decay Incidence, Disinfection, Hydrogen Peroxide, Postharvest Disease
To cite this article
Xiangchun Meng, Zepeng Huang, Chao Fan, Postharvest Treatment with Hydrogen Peroxide to Control Orange Fruit Decay Caused by Penicillum digitatum and Penicillum italicum, International Journal of Applied Agricultural Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 5, 2019, pp. 114-119. doi: 10.11648/j.ijaas.20190505.13
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Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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