Assessment of Off-Site Consequences Due to Severe Nuclear Accident According to Release Pathway Reduction Mechanisms Using Computer Code
International Journal of Science and Qualitative Analysis
Volume 2, Issue 2, September 2016, Pages: 19-23
Received: Sep. 3, 2016; Accepted: Oct. 20, 2016; Published: Nov. 8, 2016
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Authors
Elsayeda Farid Salem, Nuclear Law and Nuclear Licenses Department, Egyptian Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority, Cairo, Egypt
Asmaa. Khalill Abdeen, Quality Assurance Department, Egyptian Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority, Cairo, Egypt
Mohamed Abdelrahman Salama, Quality Assurance Department, Egyptian Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority, Cairo, Egypt
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Abstract
In order to protect public health and safety from the inadvertent release of radioactive materials, during a reactor accident the defense-in-depth strategy must include; multiple layers of protection, such as prevention of accidents, mitigation features and emergency preparedness program that include measures such as sheltering and evacuation. In the present work RASCAL computer code is going to be used to estimate the offsite consequences of a nuclear sever accident using release pathway reduction mechanisms in order to obtain an appropriate release at a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) operating at its full power. The existing plant (systems, equipment) assuming that will be used for accident mitigation. Calculation of the total effective dose associated with this reduction is proposed. The data obtained showed that the spray system is the most effective mechanism to mitigate dose release during the accident.
Keywords
Sever Accident, Nuclear Emergency, Total Effective Dose, RASCAL Code
To cite this article
Elsayeda Farid Salem, Asmaa. Khalill Abdeen, Mohamed Abdelrahman Salama, Assessment of Off-Site Consequences Due to Severe Nuclear Accident According to Release Pathway Reduction Mechanisms Using Computer Code, International Journal of Science and Qualitative Analysis. Vol. 2, No. 2, 2016, pp. 19-23. doi: 10.11648/j.ijsqa.20160202.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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