Recent Progresses of Long Noncoding RNA
Biomedical Sciences
Volume 1, Issue 3, September 2015, Pages: 34-37
Received: Jan. 12, 2016; Accepted: Jan. 20, 2016; Published: Feb. 4, 2016
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Authors
Shen Tao, Chinese Academy of Sciences Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Disease, School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China
Zhang Xiu-Lei, Chinese Academy of Sciences Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Disease, School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China
Liang Xiao-Lin, Chinese Academy of Sciences Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Disease, School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China
Min Sai-Nan, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing, China
Guo Yu-Zhu, Chinese Academy of Sciences Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Disease, School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China
Wang Xiang-Ting, Chinese Academy of Sciences Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Disease, School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China
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Abstract
Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a class of regulatory RNA molecules that are no shorter than 200 nucleotides in length with rare protein encoding capacity. It is widely accepted nowadays that lncRNAs play important roles in tumorigenesis and related events. Recently, some comprehensive investigations and major advances of lncRNAs have also been made in other fields including cardiovascular and central nervous system. Here, we will overview the recent progress of lncRNAs, particularly in those fields other than cancer biology, from which big breakthroughs or milestone works have been made.
Keywords
Long Noncoding RNAs, Cardiovascular System, Nervous System, Imprinting
To cite this article
Shen Tao, Zhang Xiu-Lei, Liang Xiao-Lin, Min Sai-Nan, Guo Yu-Zhu, Wang Xiang-Ting, Recent Progresses of Long Noncoding RNA, Biomedical Sciences. Vol. 1, No. 3, 2015, pp. 34-37. doi: 10.11648/j.bs.20150103.12
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Copyright © 2015 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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