School-Based Practices for Entrepreneurship Skills Acquisition in Secondary Schools in Delta State of Nigeria
International Journal of Vocational Education and Training Research
Volume 3, Issue 5, October 2017, Pages: 40-50
Received: Apr. 21, 2017; Accepted: May 5, 2017; Published: Nov. 23, 2017
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Authors
Godwin Onnoh Onajite, Department of Vocational and Technical Education, Faculty of Education, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria
Matthew Adebayo Aina, Department of Vocational and Technical Education, Faculty of Education, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria
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Abstract
This study determined school-based practices essential for entrepreneurship skills acquisition in secondary schools in Delta State. Five research questions were raised to guide the study. Descriptive survey research design was used in conducting the study. Population of the study comprised 448 principals and 3258 entrepreneurship subject teachers from 448 public secondary schools in Delta State. Purposive sampling technique was used to select a sample size of 224 principals and 652 entrepreneurship subject teachers from 224 public secondary schools in Delta State. A questionnaire titled: School-Based Practices for Entrepreneurship Skills Acquisition Questionnaire (SBPESAQ), which contained 56 items and designed on a 4 point scale was used to collect data for this study. The instrument was validated by two experts from the Department of Business Education and Department of Educational Foundations both of Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka. Reliability of the instrument was determined through a pilot-test conducted by the researcher on the instrument by selecting five principals and five business studies teachers from five public secondary schools in Anambra State. The result was found to have a reliability coefficient of 0.73 using the Cronbach Alpha Coefficient Measurement which indicated that the instrument was reliable to collect the necessary data for the study. Data were equally analyzed using mean score at 2.50 rating, frequencies and simple percentages. Consequently, from the findings of the study, it was discovered that there was need for introducing school-based practices in the secondary schools in Delta State; both principals and entrepreneurship subject teachers were highly aware and knowledgeable to a high extent about the types of school-based practices for entrepreneurship skills acquisition in secondary schools in Delta State; and a large percentage of principals and entrepreneurship subject teachers accepted the incorporation of school-based practices as part of their academic programme for entrepreneurship skills acquisition in secondary schools in Delta State. The study recommended among others that: State Government should provide adequate funds that will promote school-based practices in the secondary education system. Adequate resources should be utilized as a way of enhancing school-based practices in the secondary education system. Non Governmental agencies and other private institutions should support school-based practices by rendering to secondary schools some financial assistance, support resources and assisting schools to collaborate with enterprises that will boost school-based practices for entrepreneurship skills acquisition in the secondary education system.
Keywords
School-Based Practices, Entrepreneurship, Skills, Secondary School, Delta State
To cite this article
Godwin Onnoh Onajite, Matthew Adebayo Aina, School-Based Practices for Entrepreneurship Skills Acquisition in Secondary Schools in Delta State of Nigeria, International Journal of Vocational Education and Training Research. Vol. 3, No. 5, 2017, pp. 40-50. doi: 10.11648/j.ijvetr.20170305.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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