Manual Lymph Drainage as a Complex Decongestive Therapy for Upper Limb Lymphedema After Breast Cancer Operation
Journal of Family Medicine and Health Care
Volume 5, Issue 4, December 2019, Pages: 45-49
Received: Aug. 15, 2019; Accepted: Sep. 10, 2019; Published: Oct. 9, 2019
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Authors
Ma Yu-hua, Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Guo Xiao-xia, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Zhang Li-tao, Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Lv Rong-zhao, Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Li Shi-ting, Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Tang Wan, Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
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Abstract
Objective We aim to explore the clinical effect of manual lymph drainage as a complex decongestive therapy on improving upper limb lymphedema after breast cancer operation. Methods Manual lymph drainage was performed on 28 patients with lymphedema after receiving breast cancer operation. Circumference measurement was done at transverse palmar crease, transverse carpal crease, 10cm below transverse cubital crease, 10 cm above transverse cubital crease and 20 cm above transverse cubital crease at the first day before treatment and 1 day, 1 week, 2 weeks and 3 weeks after treatment. The movement of shoulder joints, pain and numbness of patients were recorded. Results After 3 weeks of manual lymph drainage, the circumference at transverse palmar crease, transverse carpal crease, 10cm below transverse cubital crease, 10 cm above transverse cubital crease and 20 cm above transverse cubital crease was significantly lower than that before treatment. The detumescence of the middle segment of forearm (10 cm below transverse cubital crease) was better than that of the middle segment of upper arm (10 cm above transverse cubital crease) and the superior segment of upper arm (20 cm above transverse cubital crease) with a significant difference (P<0.05). After the treatment of manual lymph drainage, the life quality of patients improved greatly and there was a significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusion Manual lymph drainage as a complex decongestive therapy for lymphedema after breast cancer operation is safe, effective and thus well worth clinical application.
Keywords
Lymphedema, Manual Lymph Drainage, Complex Decongestive Therapy, Breast Cancer
To cite this article
Ma Yu-hua, Guo Xiao-xia, Zhang Li-tao, Lv Rong-zhao, Li Shi-ting, Tang Wan, Manual Lymph Drainage as a Complex Decongestive Therapy for Upper Limb Lymphedema After Breast Cancer Operation, Journal of Family Medicine and Health Care. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2019, pp. 45-49. doi: 10.11648/j.jfmhc.20190504.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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