Modeling Time-to- Recovery of Adult Diabetic Patients Using Cox-Proportional Hazards Model
International Journal of Statistical Distributions and Applications
Volume 3, Issue 4, December 2017, Pages: 67-71
Received: Aug. 21, 2017; Accepted: Sep. 7, 2017; Published: Nov. 10, 2017
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Authors
Abiyot Negash Terefe, Department of Statistics, College of Natural and Computational Science, Mizan-Tepi University, Tepi, Ethiopia
Assaye Belay Gelaw, Department of Statistics, College of Natural and Computational Science, Mizan-Tepi University, Tepi, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Diabetes is a group of diseases marked by high or low level of glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action or both. The objective of this study is to model time-to-first recovery of adult diabetic patients using Cox Proportional Hazards model. A retrospective data was obtained from Jimma University Specialized Hospital diabetic patient clinic whose age 18 years and under treatments in between September 2010 and August 2013 are included in the study. Time of fasting blood sugar level to reach the first normal range, 70-130 mg/dl of blood were the response variable. Cox Proportional Hazard model were used. Types of diabetic, bodyweight at baseline, fasting blood sugar at baseline, sex and age of patients are significantly associated with time to first recovery of diabetic patients. These variables are important factors that should be considered during the selection phase a treatment (combination of treatments) for diabetes.
Keywords
Akaike’s Information Criterion, Cox-Snell, Deviance Residuals
To cite this article
Abiyot Negash Terefe, Assaye Belay Gelaw, Modeling Time-to- Recovery of Adult Diabetic Patients Using Cox-Proportional Hazards Model, International Journal of Statistical Distributions and Applications. Vol. 3, No. 4, 2017, pp. 67-71. doi: 10.11648/j.ijsd.20170304.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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