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Evaluation of Aflatoxin M1 Residues in Cow's Milk Sold in the Communes of Ouagadougou and Dedougou (Burkina Faso)
American Journal of Quantum Chemistry and Molecular Spectroscopy
Volume 4, Issue 2, December 2020, Pages: 17-21
Received: Sep. 17, 2020; Accepted: Oct. 5, 2020; Published: Dec. 11, 2020
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Authors
Kiessoun Konaté, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Joseph Ki-ZERBO, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; Applied Sciences and Technologies Training and Research Unit, University of Dedougou, Dedougou, Burkina Faso
Balamoussa Santara, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Joseph Ki-ZERBO, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; Applied Sciences and Technologies Training and Research Unit, University of Dedougou, Dedougou, Burkina Faso
Dominique Ouryagala Sanou, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Joseph Ki-ZERBO, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; Applied Sciences and Technologies Training and Research Unit, University of Dedougou, Dedougou, Burkina Faso
Mamoudou Hama Dicko, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Joseph Ki-ZERBO, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
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Abstract
Aflatoxins B1 mainly produced by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. Indeed, aflatoxins B1 (AFB1) are mycotoxins that can contaminate a wide variety of foods. The ingestion of food contaminated with farm animals may result in the alteration of their health and zootechnical performance as well as a food safety problem related to the presence of aflatoxin M1 residues (AFM1) in the products animals, especially milk. In humans, aflatoxins, especially AFM1, found mostly in milk, have a hepatotoxic, carcinogenic, immunotoxic effect and also impair the functioning of reproductive organs. It is for this reason that the present study was initiated to evaluate the residues of aflatoxin M1 in the cow's milk sold in the communes of Ouagadougou and Dedougou. A collection of 16 and 20 samples was carried out respectively in the cities of Dedougou and Ouagadougou. Chromatographic analysis by HPLC of our samples showed an absence of aflatoxin M1 in both localities. A comparison of our results with the standard set by the European Commission (EC) shows that our samples have good quality. These results could be justified by the good quality of cow's food. In view of these results, farmers should be encouraged to adopt and continue a healthy diet of draft cows for a better valorization of local milk.
Keywords
Cow's Milk, Aflatoxin B1, Aflatoxin M1 Residues
To cite this article
Kiessoun Konaté, Balamoussa Santara, Dominique Ouryagala Sanou, Mamoudou Hama Dicko, Evaluation of Aflatoxin M1 Residues in Cow's Milk Sold in the Communes of Ouagadougou and Dedougou (Burkina Faso), American Journal of Quantum Chemistry and Molecular Spectroscopy. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2020, pp. 17-21. doi: 10.11648/j.ajqcms.20200402.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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