Discursive Structure of Humour in Stand-up Comedy Kenya: Discourse Topics and Stylistic Devices in Churchill’s Performances
International Journal of Language and Linguistics
Volume 3, Issue 6, November 2015, Pages: 409-415
Received: Oct. 10, 2015; Accepted: Oct. 26, 2015; Published: Nov. 17, 2015
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Authors
Mary Muthoni Githatu, Department of Literature, Languages and Linguistics, Egerton University, Nakuru, Kenya
Furaha Chai, Department of Literature, Languages and Linguistics, Egerton University, Nakuru, Kenya
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Abstract
Humour is a central component in stand-up comedy. The intent of a stand-up comedian is to amuse the audience and the audience laughter is a reaction to humour. This studysought to establish the discourse topics established by the stand-up comedian and the stylistic devices embedded in these topics to elicit laughter from the audience. To achieve this, the study focused on selected performances of Churchill, a comedian, in Churchill Live a Kenyan stand-up comedy. The study was guided by General Theory of Verbal Humour, which was useful in identifying the stylistic devices. Churchill routines from three episodes were transcribed for analysis. The results obtained indicate that social class, ethnicity, politics, religion and sports, are the most commonly discussed topics. The stylistic devices employed are contrast, songs, hyperbole, allusion, ridicule, ridicule and flashback.
Keywords
Discursive Structure, Humour, Discourse Topics, Stylistic Devices, Stand-Up Comedy, Kenya
To cite this article
Mary Muthoni Githatu, Furaha Chai, Discursive Structure of Humour in Stand-up Comedy Kenya: Discourse Topics and Stylistic Devices in Churchill’s Performances, International Journal of Language and Linguistics. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 409-415. doi: 10.11648/j.ijll.20150306.24
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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