“I’m a Learner, I’m Dominantly a Learner”: A Case Study of Code-Switching of an EFL University Teacher Outside Classrooms
International Journal of Language and Linguistics
Volume 3, Issue 6, November 2015, Pages: 466-473
Received: Dec. 10, 2015; Accepted: Dec. 21, 2015; Published: Jan. 8, 2016
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Authors
Xiaofang Qian, School of Foreign Languages and Literature, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China
Wei Liu, International Relations and Recruitment, University of Alberta International, Alberta, Canada
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Abstract
Reported here is part of a bigger study to investigate the code-switching behavior among the foreign language teaching professionals. This study is informed by the Markedness Model and identity-in- Interaction approach with its focus on the social and discourse motivations of code-switching. An ethnographic design is used to collect instances of code-switching of a university EFL teacher outside his classrooms. The findings suggest the code-switching behavior is an important site of their professional identity construction. Large chunks of switching to English in daily communications with peers are used as a strategy for sustained professional development. The positive attitude to code switching shows the high status of the English language and the profession of EFL in China. In the global context, the frequent code-switching to English in an academic setting in Beijing can be seen as an indication of the hegemonic position of the English language in the world academic discourse.
Keywords
Code-Switching, EFL, Language Identity, Language Teacher Education, Acculturation
To cite this article
Xiaofang Qian, Wei Liu, “I’m a Learner, I’m Dominantly a Learner”: A Case Study of Code-Switching of an EFL University Teacher Outside Classrooms, International Journal of Language and Linguistics. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 466-473. doi: 10.11648/j.ijll.20150306.31
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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