Emerson’s Passion for Indian Thought
International Journal of Literature and Arts
Volume 1, Issue 1, July 2013, Pages: 1-6
Received: May 19, 2013; Published: Jun. 10, 2013
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Author
Sardar M. Anwaruddin, Department of English, North South University, Bangladesh
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Abstract
The first group of American thinkers who seriously examined non-Western spiritual traditions such as Hinduism and Buddhism was the Transcendentalists. The prominent members of this group included Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, Bronson Alcott, and Elizabeth Peabody. In general, the Transcendentalists argued for a non-dogmatic and more universalistic perspective of life and the world. As the intellectual guru of this group, Emerson “represent[ed] the best in the spiritual explorer” (Moore 74). Unlike most of his predecessors and contemporaries, he was sensitive to and passionate about non-Western spiritual traditions and philosophies. Today, the sources of Emerson’s knowledge and inspiration are of particular interest to the critics and researchers of comparative literature. In this article, I explore Emerson’s passion for Indian thought with specific reference to Brahma, the Bhagavad Gita, and the laws of karma.
Keywords
Emerson, Indian thought, Brahma, Gita, Karma
To cite this article
Sardar M. Anwaruddin, Emerson’s Passion for Indian Thought, International Journal of Literature and Arts. Vol. 1, No. 1, 2013, pp. 1-6. doi: 10.11648/j.ijla.20130101.11
References
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