The Role of Nature and Post-Pastoral Signs in William Blake’s “Night” and “A Little Girl Lost”
International Journal of Literature and Arts
Volume 2, Issue 2, March 2014, Pages: 44-48
Received: Mar. 7, 2014; Published: Mar. 30, 2014
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Authors
Mohsen Zohrab Baigy, Department of English Language and Literature, College of Humanities, Boroujerd Branch, Islamic Azad University, Boroujerd, Iran
Bahman Zarrinjooee, Department of English Language and Literature, College of Humanities, Boroujerd Branch, Islamic Azad University, Boroujerd, Iran
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Abstract
This study traces the role of nature in William Blake’s “Night” and “A Little Girl Lost” through the application of three out of six crucial features of Gifford’s Post-pastoral principles. Within the framework of the Eco-critical paradigm, which is still very much a work in progress, the analysis of these poems from this perspective puts emphasis on the sense of sorrow towards the natural world, the exploitation of the planet, here the Earth, which is of the same as the oppression and exploitation of women and minorities, and the recognition of the inner world and the workings of the outer world; i.e., man’s inner nature can be understood in relation to his external nature. Moreover, from Post-pastoral perspective, this paper shows the oppressive treatments of female being and identity which is one of the consequences of the industrialism as well as the restricted norms of British Evangelical Church. Women are among those who are suppressed and deprived from the privileges of life except prostitution. Finally, this study sheds more light on Blake’s implication of Jerusalem in relation to man’s continuous desire to reach a compromise between the inner and outer natures
Keywords
Nature, Post-Pastoral, Exploitation of Women, Oppression, Evangelical Church, Prostitution
To cite this article
Mohsen Zohrab Baigy, Bahman Zarrinjooee, The Role of Nature and Post-Pastoral Signs in William Blake’s “Night” and “A Little Girl Lost”, International Journal of Literature and Arts. Vol. 2, No. 2, 2014, pp. 44-48. doi: 10.11648/j.ijla.20140202.14
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