Regulated Hatred in Sense and Sensibility (1811) and Persuasion (1816) by Jane Austen
International Journal of Literature and Arts
Volume 2, Issue 4, July 2014, Pages: 110-122
Received: Jun. 29, 2014; Accepted: Jul. 18, 2014; Published: Jul. 30, 2014
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Author
Najlaa Hosny Ameen Mohammed, Assistant Professor of English Literature, English Department, Vice-Dean of Huraymilaa College of Science and Humanities, Shaqra University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
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Abstract
This research examines the theory of ‘regulated hatred’ in two masterpieces by Jane Austen: Sense and Sensibility (1811) and Persuasion (1816). To analyse these novels, the paper adopts an interdisciplinary approach, including psychological, biographical, and New Historicist approaches; taking its inspiration from the theory initially introduced by D. W. Harding in his article ‘Regulated Hatred: An Aspect of the work of Jane Austen’ (1940), alongside C. J. Jung’s theory of ‘the formation of artist’s creativity’ highlighted in his article ‘Psychology and Literature’ (1930). The study is divided into three sections. The first section introduces the theoretical aspects of the research, outlining Harding and Jung’s theories. A brief overview of the plot of the two novels is set out, to assist in establishing the author’s narrative techniques. The second section investigates the psychological theories of Austen’s two novels Persuasion and Sense and Sensibility in reference to the theoretical framework. There is also an examination of the ways in which Austen employs her hatred toward both her enemies and unpolished manners in society, through an examination of her narrative techniques from a psychological, biographical and New Historicist approach. These include: her varying tones, her artistic representation, her tyrannical style and intellectual perspective, and the unequal treatment of her characters. In addition, there is a discussion of Austen’s motives in writing these two novels. This section discusses the assumptions behind the attempt to deduce new literary, social and political interpretations of Austen’s art, examining her novels as, amusement and entertainment, social critique, or as an outlet of her inner emotion with the aim of reforming the ills of society. The third section illustrates the ways in which Austen adopts a new form of realism; in particular, how she employs her pen to revolutionise the ruling standards of social groups. Austen is seen to address the internal struggles of society successfully, by sympathising with, or disdaining, her characters in both novels. The study, therefore, offers a complementary understanding of the inner psychology of the creative Jane Austen, as well as of her art and the era in which she lived.
Keywords
Introduction, Theoretical Framework, Jane Austen's Characters, Conclusion
To cite this article
Najlaa Hosny Ameen Mohammed, Regulated Hatred in Sense and Sensibility (1811) and Persuasion (1816) by Jane Austen, International Journal of Literature and Arts. Vol. 2, No. 4, 2014, pp. 110-122. doi: 10.11648/j.ijla.20140204.15
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