A Structural Study of Hemingway's the Old Man and the Sea Through Dual Oppositions
International Journal of Literature and Arts
Volume 3, Issue 6, November 2015, Pages: 152-157
Received: Oct. 20, 2015; Accepted: Oct. 29, 2015; Published: Dec. 2, 2015
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Author
Asma Jasim Muhammad, University of Sulaimani, School of Languages Department of English, Sulaimani, Kurdistan, Iraq
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Abstract
Dual oppositions are vital to the structuralist view which appreciated a wide usage in diverse arenas of life. One of the most crucial arenas is literary language as language is the most complicated means of passing on senses. Inside one manuscript, meaning is conveyed merely sensibly, and structuralists and semioticians search for a number of internal constructions requesting what the sorts are inside which meaning is uttered and the way they are arranged. The reader, because of this approach, can perceive definite dual pairs to discover the conceivable meaning of literary manuscripts. This finding of the dual oppositions is one of the dominant tactics of reading and interpretation. So, dual oppositions are signs to be unravelled. This approach offers not only a concept but also a method of practical criticism. Thus, meaning-finding approach can be followed in the course of evaluation of Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea, to find the hidden meanings that can be probed examining the shallow structure.
Keywords
Meaning Making, the Old Man and the Sea, Dual Oppositions
To cite this article
Asma Jasim Muhammad, A Structural Study of Hemingway's the Old Man and the Sea Through Dual Oppositions, International Journal of Literature and Arts. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 152-157. doi: 10.11648/j.ijla.20150306.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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