Please enter verification code
Confirm
Influence of the Conditions of Exposure of Pigs Carcasses (Sus scrofa domesticus L.) on the Egg-Laying Delay of Necrophagous Diptera in the Guinean Zone of Ivory Coast
American Journal of Entomology
Volume 4, Issue 4, December 2020, Pages: 66-73
Received: Nov. 25, 2020; Accepted: Dec. 16, 2020; Published: Dec. 22, 2020
Views 46      Downloads 30
Authors
Kpama-Yapo Yapibie Carine Eurudice, Department of Biosciences, Laboratory for Natural Environments and Biodiversity Conservation, Felix Houphouet Boigny University of Cocody, Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Dao Hassane, Department of Biosciences, Laboratory for Natural Environments and Biodiversity Conservation, Felix Houphouet Boigny University of Cocody, Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Koffi Alexandre Franklin, National Institute of Public Hygiene (INHP), Anti Vector Control Service, Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Aboua Louis Roi Nondenot, Department of Biosciences, Laboratory for Natural Environments and Biodiversity Conservation, Felix Houphouet Boigny University of Cocody, Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
A decaying cadaver is particularly attractive to necrophagous insects, more specifically Diptera. These are the first to lay their eggs on corpses. For the post mortem interval determination, the entomologist needs to know the precise time of the first egg-laying. The objective of this study is to determine the egg laying delay of these insects on a cadaver exposed in different conditions in the Guinean zone of Côte d'Ivoire. To do this, our work was been carried out in a natural environment at the National Agronomic Research Center. The experimental setup consisted of four types of wire mesh cages corresponding to the following cases: cadavers exposed to the open air or control cadavers, semi-immersed cadavers, cadavers wrapped in a shroud and suspended cadavers. Work on the site has been made from 29 October to 5 November 2019. The spawning period in species of Calliphoridae, was shorter on control and suspended cadavers. In Sarcophagidae, we noted a larviposition late on the suspended cadavers. Muscidae and Fanniidae, which intervened later on the decomposing corpses, were not observed on the suspended cadavers. These carcasses quickly dried out, no longer being able to provide nutrients essential for the proper development of larvae of species of these Diptera families. Depending on the accessibility of the corpses to necrophagous insects, the first egg-laying of Diptera were observed after 6 hours of exposure and the last after 174 hours. The exposure conditions of the corpses significantly influenced the time taken to lay the main necrophagous Diptera. As the first egg-laying of the flies occurs in the first moments after death, as long as the corpses is accessible, the results obtained during these experiments should be taken into account by the expert entomologist, in the estimation of the interval post-mortem upon discovery of a corpse.
Keywords
Eggs-Laying Delay, Necrophagous Diptera, Corpses, Guinean Zone, Ivory Coast
To cite this article
Kpama-Yapo Yapibie Carine Eurudice, Dao Hassane, Koffi Alexandre Franklin, Aboua Louis Roi Nondenot, Influence of the Conditions of Exposure of Pigs Carcasses (Sus scrofa domesticus L.) on the Egg-Laying Delay of Necrophagous Diptera in the Guinean Zone of Ivory Coast, American Journal of Entomology. Vol. 4, No. 4, 2020, pp. 66-73. doi: 10.11648/j.aje.20200404.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
Amendt J., Krettek R. & Zehner R., 2004. Forensic entomology, Naturwissenschaften 91 (2004) 51–65.
[2]
Goff, M. L. 2009. Early post-mortem changes and stages of decomposition in exposed cadavers. Experimental and Applied Acarology, 49, 2136.
[3]
Wyss C. & Chérix D., 2006. Treatise on Forensic Entomology, 1st Edition. Presses Polytechniques et Universitaires Romandes, Lausanne, Switzerland, 317 p.
[4]
Gaudy. E & Dourel L., 2009. Forensic Entomology: A Time Machine. Institute of Criminal Research of the National Gendarmerie.
[5]
Campobasso C. P., Di Vella G. & Introna F., 2001. Factors affecting decomposition and Diptera colonization. Forensic Science International, 120 (1-2): 18-27.
[6]
Hamel. K., 2011. Contribution to the study of the influence of temperature on the development of necrophagous insects 59p.
[7]
Wells J. D. & Lamotte L. R., 1995. Estimating maggot age from weight using inverse prediction. Journal of Forensic Sciences, 40 (4): 585-590.
[8]
Koffi A. F., Aboua L. R. N., Dao H., Djodjo M., Koffi-Tébélé J. D. E. & Kpama-Yapo C. E. Y., 2017 a. Process of colonization by necrophagous insects, of a pig corpse exposed at the open air in southern forest zone of Côte d’Ivoire. International Journal of Current Research and Academic Review 5 (7): 103-114.
[9]
Koffi A. F., Aboua L. R. N., Dao H., Djodjo M., Koffi-Tébélé J. D. E. & Mian A. K., 2018. Inventory of necrophagous insects involved in the decomposition process of a pig corpse (Sus scrofa domesticus L.) exposed to the open air in the southern forest zone of Côte d'Ivoire. European journal of biomedical and pharmaceutical science, 5 (01) 51-62.
[10]
Dao H., Aboua L. R. N., Koffi A. F. & Kpama-Yapo C. E. Y., 2017. Biological parameters of Sarcophaga carnaria L. (Diptera: Sarcophagidae), necrophagous fly breeding on two pig substrates (Sus scrofa domesticus L.) at the national floristic center, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. International Journal of Research and Development Organisation, 3 (1): 1-16.
[11]
Dao H., Aboua L. R N., Koffi A. F., Agboka K., Tuo Y. & Yapo Y. E. C. Epouse-Kpama, 2018. Influence of the ecological zone on the necrophagous insects’ activities involved in the process of decomposition of pig carcasses (Sus scrofa domesticus L.) exposed to the open air in the sub-sudanese zone of Côte d’Ivoire. International Journal of Entomology Research, 3 (5) 07-16.
[12]
Dao H., Aboua L. R. N., Agboka K., Koffi A. F. & Djodjo M., 2019. Influence of the seasons on the activity of necrophagous insects in the decomposition process of dead pigs (Sus scrofa domesticus L.) exposed to the open air in the sub-Sudanese zone of Côte d'Ivoire. Africa SCIENCE 15 (1) 361-376.
[13]
Anonyme, 2020. CNES image data, Accessed 08/12/2020.
[14]
Prins A. J., 1982. Morphological and biological notes on six South African Blow-flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) and their immature stages. Annals of the South Africa Museum, 90 (1982): 201-217.
[15]
Smith K. G. V., 1986. A manual of forensic entomology. British Museum (Natural History), London and Cornell University Press, Ithaca, N. Y., 205 p.
[16]
Delvare G. & Alberlenc H. P., 1989. Insects from Africa and tropical America: keys to family recognition. Book, CIRAD, 82 p.
[17]
Couri S. M., 2007. A key to the Afrotropical genera of Muscidae (Diptera). Revista Brasileira de Zoologia, 24 (1): 175-184.
[18]
Claudio J. B. C. & Cátia A. M. P., 2008. Key to the adults of the most common forensic species of Diptera in South America. Revista Brasileira d’Entomologia, 52 (3): 390-406.
[19]
Szpila K., 2009. Key for identification of European and Mediteranean blowflies (Diptera, Calliphoridae) of forensic importance Adult flies. Nicolaus Copernic University Institute of Ecology and Environnental Protection Departement of Animal Ecoogy, 2014, 18.
[20]
Whitworth T., 2010. Keys to the genera and species of blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) of the West Indies and description of a new species of Lucilia Robineau-Desvoidy. Zootaxa, 2663: 1-35.
[21]
Irish S., Lindsay T. & Wyatt N., 2014. Key to adults of Afrotropical species of the genus Chrysomya Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera: Calliphoridae). African Entomology, 22 (2): 297-306.
[22]
Rochefort S., Marjolaine Giroux, Jade Savage & Terry A. Wheeler, 2015. Key to Forensically Important Piophilidae (Diptera) in the Nearctic Region Canadian Journal of Arthropod Identification 27 (1) 37p.
[23]
Pintoe K Vairo, Mauricio Osvaldo Moura, Cátia Antunes de Mello-Patiu 2015. Comparative morphology and identification key for females of nine Sarcophagidae species (Diptera) with forensic importance in Southern Brazil, Revista Brasileira de Entomologia.; 59: 177-187.
[24]
Ramade F., 1984. Elements of ecology. Fundamental ecology. Ed. Mc. Graw-Hill, Paris, France, 379 p.
[25]
Dajoz R., 2000. Precise of ecology, 7th edition, Dunod, Paris, 615pp.
[26]
Braack L. E., 1987. Community dynamics of carrion-attendant arthropods in tropical African woodland. Oecologia, 72 (3): 402-409.
[27]
Picimbon J. F., 2002. The chemosensory peri-receptors of insects. Medicine / Sciences, 18: 1089-1094.
[28]
Kelling J., Biancaniello G. & Den Otter C. J., 2003. Effect of age and sex on the sensitivity of antennal and palpal olfactory cells of houseflies. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, 106 (1): 45-51.
[29]
Dekeirsschieter J., 2007. Study of the odors emitted by decaying pig carcasses (Sus domesticus scrofa L.) and monitoring of post-mortem colonization by necrophagous insects. End of studies thesis. University Faculty of Agronomic Sciences of Gembloux, Belgium, 104 p.
[30]
Silahuddin S. A., Baha L., Hiromu K., Chong C. H. & Walter E., 2015. The Importance of Habitat in the Ecology of Decomposition on Rabbit Carcasses in Malaysia: Implications in Forensic Entomology. Journal of Medical Entomology, 52 (1): 9-23.
[31]
Charabidze D. and Gosselin M., 2014. Insects, corpses and crime scenes. Principles and applications of forensic entomology. Ed. De Boeck., 261 p., 16 chapters.
[32]
Dekeirsschieter J., Verheggen F. J., Haubruge E. & Brostaux Y., 2011. Carrion beetles visiting pig carcasses during early spring in urban, forest and agricultural biotopes of Western Europe. Journal of Insect Science, 11 (73): 1-13.
[33]
Boulay J., 2015. Study of the aggregation behavior of necrophagous Diptera larvae: from the individual to the collective. Thesis from the University of Lille II, Université Libre de Bruxelles. 151p.
[34]
Wyss C., 2000. Entomological investigation 83-insp, determination of the post-mortem time: Annex 2.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186