Physiochemical and Biological Properties of Water of Khyber Paktun Khwa District Bannu, Pakistan 2014
International Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology
Volume 2, Issue 1, June 2018, Pages: 12-15
Received: Jul. 18, 2018; Accepted: Aug. 8, 2018; Published: Sep. 5, 2018
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Authors
Waqas Ahmad Shams, Department of Zoology, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, Mardan, Pakistan
Unays Siraj, Department of Zoology, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, Mardan, Pakistan
Gauhar Rehman, Department of Zoology, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, Mardan, Pakistan
Zahid Ullah, Department of Zoology, University of Buner, Buner, Pakistan
Naveed Ahmad, Department of Zoology, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, Mardan, Pakistan
Maaz Miraj, Department of Zoology, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, Mardan, Pakistan
Asad Ullah, Department of Zoology, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, Mardan, Pakistan
Sadaf Niaz, Department of Zoology, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, Mardan, Pakistan
Khurshaid Khan, Department of Zoology, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, Mardan, Pakistan
Huma Alam, Department of Zoology, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, Mardan, Pakistan
Nida Gul, Department of Zoology, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, Mardan, Pakistan
Tahira Naz, Department of Zoology, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, Mardan, Pakistan
Saif ul Islam, Department of Zoology, Government Degree College Lahor, Swabi, Pakistan
Abdul Jamil Khan, Department of Zoology, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, Mardan, Pakistan
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Abstract
In developing countries, Arsenic concentrations overhead satisfactory values for drinking water have been identified in many countries and this should, therefore, it is a global concern. The presence of arsenic in subsurface aquifers and drinking water systems is a possibly serious social health hazard. The existing population growth in Pakistan and other developing countries will have a straight bearing on the water zone for meeting the domestic, industrial and agricultural needs. Pakistan is about to exhaust its accessible water resources and is on the verge of becoming a water deficit country. Water contamination is a serious threat in Pakistan, as almost 70% of its surface waters, as well as its groundwater reserves, have contaminated by biological, organic and inorganic pollutants. In some areas of Pakistan, a number of shallow aquifers and tube wells are contaminated with arsenic at levels which are above the recommended USEPA arsenic level of 10 ppb (10 g L−1). Opposing health effects including human mortality from drinking water are well documented and can be attributed to arsenic contamination. All of the areas of Bannu district was studied. The present paper reviews appropriate and low-cost methods for the elimination of arsenic from drinking waters.
Keywords
PH, Turbidity, Total Dissolved Solid, Electric Conductivity, E. coli, Arsenic
To cite this article
Waqas Ahmad Shams, Unays Siraj, Gauhar Rehman, Zahid Ullah, Naveed Ahmad, Maaz Miraj, Asad Ullah, Sadaf Niaz, Khurshaid Khan, Huma Alam, Nida Gul, Tahira Naz, Saif ul Islam, Abdul Jamil Khan, Physiochemical and Biological Properties of Water of Khyber Paktun Khwa District Bannu, Pakistan 2014, International Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology. Vol. 2, No. 1, 2018, pp. 12-15. doi: 10.11648/j.ijpp.20180201.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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