Development of Aloe Vera Jelly for Diabetic Patients and Analysis of Its Physicochemical Properties
International Journal of Food Science and Biotechnology
Volume 5, Issue 1, March 2020, Pages: 1-5
Received: Nov. 9, 2019; Accepted: Dec. 9, 2019; Published: Jan. 6, 2020
Views 265      Downloads 165
Authors
Rebeka Sultana, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University, Santosh, Bangladesh
Rokeya Begum, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University, Santosh, Bangladesh
Md. Nannur Rahman, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University, Santosh, Bangladesh
Md. Rakibul Hasan, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University, Santosh, Bangladesh
Md. Azizul Haque, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University, Santosh, Bangladesh
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
An attempt has been made in the present study to develop aloe vera jelly with honey in a view using it as an anti-diabetic agent for its therapeutic properties. Different aloe vera jellies were prepared with different sweetening agents including honey, sugar and aspartame to make a comparison on the basis of nutrient content, bioactive compounds, organoleptic quality, syneresis and microbial stability. Prepared jellies were analyzed for physico-chemical properties, bio-active compound (total phenolic content, vitamin C, and antioxidant) and organoleptic properties. Among the three jellies aloe vera jelly with honey exerts better organoleptic properties, higher consumer acceptance, higher textural profile, highest amount of bio-active compounds (total phenolic content, vitamin C and antioxidant) and lowest syneresis. Thus formulation of aloe vera jelly with incorporation of honey increases the sensory attributes, textural profile and decrease syneresis followed by longer shelf life. Therefore, aloe vera jelly with honey could be recommended for large scale production of aloe vera jelly which can be promoted as an anti-diabetic agent due to hypoglycemic properties of aloe vera and honey.
Keywords
Aloe Vera Gel, Jelly, Antioxidant, Honey, Anti-diabetic, Syneresis
To cite this article
Rebeka Sultana, Rokeya Begum, Md. Nannur Rahman, Md. Rakibul Hasan, Md. Azizul Haque, Development of Aloe Vera Jelly for Diabetic Patients and Analysis of Its Physicochemical Properties, International Journal of Food Science and Biotechnology. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2020, pp. 1-5. doi: 10.11648/j.ijfsb.20200501.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
Gupta, R., Bajpai, K. G., John, S. and Saxena, A. M. 2008. An: overview of Indian novel traditional medicinal plants with antidiabetic potentials. African J Trod Comp Alt Med 5 (1): 1-17.
[2]
International Diabetes Federation. 2017. IDF Diabetes Atlas, 8th ed. Brussels, Belgium: International Diabetes Federation.
[3]
International Diabetes Federation. 2009. IDF Diabetes Atlas, 4th ed. Brussels, Belgium: International Diabetes Federation.
[4]
International Diabetes Federation. 2011. IDF Diabetes Atlas, 5th ed. Brussels, Belgium: International Diabetes Federation.
[5]
International Diabetes Federation. 2013. IDF Diabetes Atlas, 6th ed. Brussels, Belgium: International Diabetes Federation.
[6]
International Diabetes Federation. 2015. IDF Diabetes Atlas, 7th ed. Brussels, Belgium: International Diabetes Federation.
[7]
Thorfeldt, S. 2005. Herbs in diabetes mellitus. Alt Med Rev 9: 13–18.
[8]
Sharrif, M. M. and Verma, S. K. 2011. Aloe vera their chemicals composition and applications: a review. Int J Biol Med Res; 2 (1): 466–71.
[9]
Misawa, E., Tanaka, M., Nomaguchi, M., Yamada, M., Toida, T., Takase, M., Iwatsuki, K. and Kawada, T. 2008. Administration of phytosterols isolated from Aloe vera gel reduce visceral fat mass and improve hyperglycemia in Zucker dabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. J Obe Res Clin Prac 2: 239–245.
[10]
Bobiş, O., Daniel, S., Dezmirean and Moise, A. R. (2018). Honey and Diabetes: The Importance of Natural Simple Sugars in Diet for Preventing and Treating Different Type of Diabetes. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, Article ID 4757893, 12 pages. https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/4757893.
[11]
Bantle, J. P. 2009. Dietary fructose and metabolic syndrome and diabetes. The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 139, no. 6, pp. 1263S–1268S.
[12]
Kwon, S., Kim, Y. J. and Kim, M. K. 2008. Effect of fructose or sucrose feeding with different levels on oral glucose tolerance test in normal and type 2 diabetic rats. Nutrition Research and Practice, vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 252–258.
[13]
Erejuwa, O. O., Sulaiman, S. A. and Wahab, M. S. 2012. Fructose might contribute to the hypoglycemic effect of honey. Molecules, vol. 17, no. 12, pp. 1900–1915.
[14]
Kellet, G. L., Brot-Laroche, E. and Mace, O. J. 2008. Sugar absorption in the intestine: the role of GLUT2. Annual Reviews of Nutrition, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 35–54.
[15]
Moran, T. H. and McHugh, P. R. 1981. Distinction among three sugars in their effects on gastric emptying and satiety. American Journal of Physiology Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, vol. 241, no. 1, pp. R25–R30.
[16]
Gregory, P. C., McFadyen, M. and Rayner, D. V. 1989. Relation between gastric emptying and short-term regulation of food intake in the pig. Physiology & Bahaviour, vol. 45, no. 4, pp. 677–683.
[17]
Thibault, L. 1994. Dietary carbohydrates: effects on self-selection, plasma glucose and insulin and brain indoleaminergic systems in rat. Appetite, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 275–286.
[18]
Meirelles, C. J., Oliveira, L. A., Jordao, A. A. and Navarro, A. M. 2011. Metabolic effects of the ingestion of different fructose sources in rats. Experimental and Clinical Endocrinology & Diabetes, vol. 119, no. 4, pp. 218–220.
[19]
Fujisawa, T., Riby, J. and Kretchmer, N. 1991. Intestinal absorption of fructose in the rat. Gastroenterology, vol. 101, no. 2, pp. 360–367.
[20]
Wichchukita, S. and O’Mahonyc, M. 2014. The 9-point hedonic scale and hedonic ranking in food science: some reappraisals and alternatives. Society of Cemical Industry, doi: 10.1002/jsfa.6993.
[21]
Koh, P. C., Leong, C. M. and Noranizan, M. A. 2014. Microwave-assisted extraction of pectin from jackfruit rinds using different power levels. International Food Research Journal 21 2091–2097.
[22]
Caric, M., Milanovic, S. and Vucelja, D. 2000. Standard Methods for Milk and Milk Products Analysis. Novi Sad, Srbija.
[23]
Hassan, L. K., Haggag, H. F., El Kalyoubi, M. H., EL-Aziz, M. A., El-Sayed, M. M. and Sayed, A. F. 2015. Physico-chemical properties of yoghurt containing cress seed mucilage or guar gum. Annals of Agricultural Science; 60 (1): 21-8.
[24]
Singleton, V. I. and Rossi, J. A. 1965. Calorimetri of total phenols with phosphomolybdic - phosphotungstic acid reagents. Am J Enol Viticult. 16: 144-158.
[25]
Miliauskas, G., Venskotonis, P. R. and Beek, V. T. A. 2004. Screening of radical scavenging activity of some medical and aromatic plant extracts. Food Chem. 84: 231-237.
[26]
Harringan, W. F. and Mccance, M. E. 1976. Laboratory methods in food microbiology. Academic Press, London.
[27]
Vidic, D., Tarić, E., Alagić, J. and Maksimović, M. 2014. Determination of total phenolic content and antioxidant activity of ethanol extracts from Aloe spp. Bulletin of the Chemists and Technologists of Bosnia and Herzegovina, 42, 5-10.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186