Determination of Absorbed Dose Results from Radioactive Waste Sampling and Assay
American Journal of Mechanics and Applications
Volume 6, Issue 1, March 2018, Pages: 23-36
Received: Dec. 29, 2017; Accepted: Mar. 5, 2018; Published: Mar. 23, 2018
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Authors
Saad Mohammed Abd, Radioactive Waste Treatment and Management Directorate, Ministry of Science and Technology, Baghdad, Iraq
Taha Yaseen Mansoor, Radioactive Waste Treatment and Management Directorate, Ministry of Science and Technology, Baghdad, Iraq
Hussein Saady Al-Daffaie, Radioactive Waste Treatment and Management Directorate, Ministry of Science and Technology, Baghdad, Iraq
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Abstract
There has been great concern about the health risks associated with exposure to radioactivity present in soil, thus in this present study, absorbed dose rate measurements were carried out at some selected samples of contaminated soil. The purpose is to examine to what extent such measurements can be used to delineate the effect radiation to the workers and to assess the radiation risk of radioactive waste management personnel by calculating the annual dose of external radiation exposure and the amount of radioactive dose absorbed by the workers. Ladlum detector used to measure the exposure dose rate (µR/h). The germanium system was used to analyze the samples collected from the decontamination processes, the activity concentration ranged from (1026.21 to 25961.5) Bq/kg. The value of the annual dos rate vary between (5.55E-05 to.40E-03) Sv/h.
Keywords
External Dose Rate, Absorbed dose Rate, Activity Concentration
To cite this article
Saad Mohammed Abd, Taha Yaseen Mansoor, Hussein Saady Al-Daffaie, Determination of Absorbed Dose Results from Radioactive Waste Sampling and Assay, American Journal of Mechanics and Applications. Vol. 6, No. 1, 2018, pp. 23-36. doi: 10.11648/j.ajma.20180601.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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