Functional Equivalence: A Case Study in the Translation Process of Enhancements
Research & Development
Volume 1, Issue 1, December 2020, Pages: 1-18
Received: Aug. 7, 2020; Accepted: Aug. 25, 2020; Published: Sep. 10, 2020
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Authors
Sanggam Siahaan, Teaching Faculty, University of Huria Kristen Batak Protestan Nommensen Pematangsiantar, Pematangsiantar, Indonesia
Mungkap Mangapul Siahaan, Teaching Faculty, University of Huria Kristen Batak Protestan Nommensen Pematangsiantar, Pematangsiantar, Indonesia
Basar Lolo Siahaan, Teaching Faculty, University of Huria Kristen Batak Protestan Nommensen Pematangsiantar, Pematangsiantar, Indonesia
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Abstract
This article explores the translation process of the enhancements excerpted from the recorded authentic traditional cultural ceremony wedding speeches in Batak Toba language translated into English. The framework containing tactic, logical-semantic relation, transitivity, mood, and thematic structure is applied to reconstruct and transfer the enhancements from the source text in Batak Toba into the target text in English. It is used to assess the textual relationship quality betwee
Keywords
Functional Equivalence, Enhancement, Translation Process, Functional Grammar Theories
To cite this article
Sanggam Siahaan, Mungkap Mangapul Siahaan, Basar Lolo Siahaan, Functional Equivalence: A Case Study in the Translation Process of Enhancements, Research & Development. Vol. 1, No. 1, 2020, pp. 1-18. doi: 10.11648/j.rd.20200101.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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