The Role of Male Involvement in Modern Family Planning Utilization and Associated Factors in Arba Minch Town, Gamo Gofa Zone, Ethiopia
European Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume 5, Issue 4, July 2017, Pages: 39-44
Received: May 2, 2017; Accepted: May 20, 2017; Published: Jul. 14, 2017
Views 1448      Downloads 70
Authors
Gemechu Kejela, Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Science, Arba Minch University, Arba Minch, Ethiopia
Girma Mira, Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Science, Arba Minch University, Arba Minch, Ethiopia
Belete Gaga, Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Science, Arba Minch University, Arba Minch, Ethiopia
Aman Muktar, Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Science, Arba Minch University, Arba Minch, Ethiopia
Behailu Ololo, Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Science, Arba Minch University, Arba Minch, Ethiopia
Shanko Bezabehe, Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Science, Arba Minch University, Arba Minch, Ethiopia
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
Introduction: Men often have higher decision making power in matters such as sexual relations, family size, and seeking health care than women. On the contrary, women carry a disproportionate amount of responsibility for reproductive health matters including family planning. Even though women receive the bulk of reproductive health services, gender dynamics makes women powerless. Reproductive health matters in its broader sense should be a concern for all not for just that of women; and it needs the attention of men, entire family and the society at large. Despite this, men involvement in family planning utilization is low in Ethiopia. Objective: The main aim of this study is to assess the role of male involvement in family planning utilization and associated factors in Arba minch-town, Gamo Gofa zone, Ethiopia. Methods: A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in Arba-minch town among 406 married men. The data was collected by face-to-face interview using pre-tested structured questionnaire. Sampling units (households that fulfill the inclusion criteria) were selected by using simple random sampling method. Verbal consent was obtained from respondents by explaining the objective of the study. The questioner was developed in English then translated to local language for actual data collection. Data was cleaned, coded and entered into computer and analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. Binary and multivariable logistic regression analysis was done at 95% CI and variables with p-value of < 0.05 at multivariable logistic regression were considered as significant predictors of the outcome variable. The findings of the study were presented in text, tables and charts. Result: The result of this study shows that male involvement in modern contraceptive utilization is 68%. Respondents who were knowledgeable on modern family planning methods were 2 times more likely to involve in family planning utilization compared to those who have no knowledge (AOR [95% CI] = 2.0 [1.397, 3.992]). Respondents whose desired number of children is less than or equal to three were five times more likely involve in modern family planning utilization (AOR [95% CI] = 5.0 [0.192, 0.957]). In addition, respondents who are illiterate were 85% less likely to involve in modern family planning utilization compared to those with educational status of diploma and above (AOR [95% CI] = 0.15 [2.299, 17.738]). Conclusion and recommendation: In this study, male involvement in modern contraceptive utilization is slightly high compared to other studies conducted in the country. Male involvement on modern contraceptive utilization is largely influenced by men knowledge on modern contraceptive methods, level of education and desired number of children. Family planning Information, Education and communication should be given for men to increase their involvement in modern contraceptive utilization.
Keywords
Family Planning, Male, Involvement, Utilization, Arba Minch
To cite this article
Gemechu Kejela, Girma Mira, Belete Gaga, Aman Muktar, Behailu Ololo, Shanko Bezabehe, The Role of Male Involvement in Modern Family Planning Utilization and Associated Factors in Arba Minch Town, Gamo Gofa Zone, Ethiopia, European Journal of Preventive Medicine. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2017, pp. 39-44. doi: 10.11648/j.ejpm.20170504.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
UNICEF progress for children: A Report Card on Maternal Mortality. Number 7, September 2011.
[2]
International Planned Parenthood Federation (2011). Male Involvement in Family Planning utilization.
[3]
John C. Caldwell and Pat Caldwell. High fertility in sub-Saharan Africa. Scientific journal of America 1990; 262 (5): 118-8.
[4]
Akrinnola, B. and S. Susheela, Couple’s fertility and contraception decision making in developing countries. J. Int. Fam. Plan. Perspective, 1998: 24 (1): 18-40.
[5]
Ross J, Stover J, Adelaja D. Profiles for family planning and reproductive health programs. 2nd Edition. USA. 2009.
[6]
World Population Prospects: The 2004 Revision Population database.
[7]
Ezeh AC, Serous M, Raggers H. Men’s fertility, contraceptive use and reproductive preference. Demographic and Health Survey, Comparative Studies No. 18 Maryland: Macro International Inc, 2010.
[8]
Berhane Y. Male involvement in reproductive health. Ethiopian J. Health Dev. 2006: 20 (3): 135-136.
[9]
RHM, 2009. Men and Reproductive Health Overview. RHM archives, Retrieved from: http://www.rho.org/ html/menrh-links.html.
[10]
Cald W and P. Cald-Well. Cultural forces tending to sustain high fertility in population growth and reproduction in Sub-Saharan Africa technical analysis of fertility and consequences. Washington D. C. World Bank, 1990: pp: 199-214.
[11]
Wondimu A, Addisse A. The Involvement of Men in Family Planning: An Application of Trans-theoretical Model in Wolaita Soddo Town South Ethiopia. AJMS 2010; 2 (2): 44-50.
[12]
Tuloro T, Deressa W, Ali A, Davey G. The role of men in contraceptive use and fertility preference in Hossana Town, southern Ethiopia Ethiop J Health Dev. 2006.
[13]
Eceh, Chika A.” Contraceptive practice in Ghana: Does partner’s attitude matter?” paper presented at the annual conference of population association of America, Denver, Colorado, 19th April -2nd may 2008.
[14]
Cleland J, Ndugwa R, Zulu E. Family planning in sub-Saharan Africa: progress or stagnation? Bull World Health Organ. 2011; 89 (2): 137-43.
[15]
Terefe A, Larson C. Modern contraception use in Ethiopia: does involving husbands make a difference? Am. J Public Health. 2006; 83 (11): 1567-71.
[16]
Md. Shahidul M., shaful A. & Mahedi H. Inter-spousal communication and contraceptive uses, social science. 2014: 10 (2).
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186