Clinical and Sociodemographic Features of Children and Adolescents with Specific Learning Disorder (SLD)
American Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience
Volume 2, Issue 6, November 2014, Pages: 90-95
Received: Nov. 16, 2014; Accepted: Nov. 21, 2014; Published: Nov. 25, 2014
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Authors
Zeynep Goker, Child Psychiatry, Ankara Pediatric Hematology Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
Ozden Sukran Uneri, Child Psychiatry, Ankara Pediatric Hematology Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
Esra Guney, Child Psychiatry, Gazi University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey
Gulser Dinc, Child Psychiatry, Ankara Pediatric Hematology Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
Ozlem Hekim-Bozkurt, Child Psychiatry, Ankara Pediatric Hematology Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
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Abstract
Background: To evaluate of child or adolescent with specific learning disorder (SLD) was aimed and if there are any distinctive patterns of Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) performance, accepted as a determiner of cognitive functioning, was explored. Method: Over a-year period of data related to SLD diagnosed with DSM-IV-TR criteria was reviewed. Socio-demographic and clinical features were analyzed by using SPSS 17.0 program. Results: In a year of period, 716/25,013 had any type of SLD (2.9%). Mean age was 8.9±1.7 years with 65.4% of boys and 87.2% of under 12-year-old group. The majority of SLD subtype was “reading disorder (71.6%)”. There was no difference of SLD subtypes either distribution between sexes or age groups. Neither verbal IQ nor performance IQ was significantly different amongst four subtypes of SLD as well as total IQ scores. Also any relation was not found between subtypes of SLD and sexes or age groups in the distribution of WISC-R scores terms. Also there were not any consistent discrepancy patterns (VIQ>PIQ or PIQ>VIQ) in SLD subtypes. The presence of “reading disorder” was found significantly related with attention deficit-hyperactivity (ADHD) comorbidity (X2=7.006, p=0.008). Conclusions and Recommendations: ADHD is one of neurodevelopmental disorders and its presence could very well affect the SLD or vice versa. Further research would make clear both the relation between ADHD and SLD. Alongside cognitive measurements by using a number of intelligence scales would be enlightening in SLD field.
Keywords
Specific Learning Disorder, Children, Adolescents, DSM-IV-TR, ADHD, Comorbidity
To cite this article
Zeynep Goker, Ozden Sukran Uneri, Esra Guney, Gulser Dinc, Ozlem Hekim-Bozkurt, Clinical and Sociodemographic Features of Children and Adolescents with Specific Learning Disorder (SLD), American Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience. Vol. 2, No. 6, 2014, pp. 90-95. doi: 10.11648/j.ajpn.20140206.12
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