Effect of California Tri-Pull Taping Method on Shoulder Subluxation, Pain, Active Range of Motion and Upper Limb Functional Recovery After Stroke – A Pretest Post Test Design
American Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience
Volume 3, Issue 5, September 2015, Pages: 98-103
Received: Jun. 30, 2015; Accepted: Jul. 27, 2015; Published: Sep. 16, 2015
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Authors
Subhasish Chatterjee, Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation (MMIPR), Mullana - Ambala, Haryana, India
Narkeesh Arumugam, Punjabi University, Patiala, Punjab, India
Divya Midha, Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation (MMIPR), Mullana - Ambala, Haryana, India
Manu Goyal, Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation (MMIPR), Mullana - Ambala, Haryana, India
Ashima Arora, Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation (MMIPR), Mullana - Ambala, Haryana, India
Sorabh Sharma, Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation (MMIPR), Mullana - Ambala, Haryana, India
Senthil P. Kumar, Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation (MMIPR), Mullana - Ambala, Haryana, India
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Abstract
Objective: The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of California tri-pull taping (CTPT) method on post stroke shoulder subluxation, pain, active range of motion and upper limb functional recovery. Design: Pretest post test design. Setting: Study was conducted ininpatient and outpatient department of MM hospital Mullana- Ambala. Participants: 10 subjects with post stroke shoulder subluxation were included into the study. (7 male , 3 female). Intervention: For taping, two types of tape was used, cotton pre-tape and rigid post-tape. Tape was applied to subjects for thrice a week, for six weeks and conventional neuro rehabilitation programmewas also given to the subjects, five days a week for six weeks. Main outcome measures: Pre, and post assessment scores were taken from each subject by using, Digital Vernier caliper, visual analogue scale (VAS), Goniometer, and Fuglmeyer scale (FUG). Results: The CTPT method produced significant reduction on inferior subluxation from pre intervention to post intervention, pain. There was also significant improvement of AROM, and FUG. Conclusion: This intervention is a promising adjunct to the management of the hemiplegic subluxed shoulder. The main limitation of the study was, small sample size and no control group was used.
Keywords
Stroke, Shoulder Subluxation, CTPT, Taping
To cite this article
Subhasish Chatterjee, Narkeesh Arumugam, Divya Midha, Manu Goyal, Ashima Arora, Sorabh Sharma, Senthil P. Kumar, Effect of California Tri-Pull Taping Method on Shoulder Subluxation, Pain, Active Range of Motion and Upper Limb Functional Recovery After Stroke – A Pretest Post Test Design, American Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience. Vol. 3, No. 5, 2015, pp. 98-103. doi: 10.11648/j.ajpn.20150305.14
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