Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Enterobacteriaceae Isolated from Stool Samples at a Semi-urban Teaching Hospital
American Journal of Biomedical and Life Sciences
Volume 3, Issue 6, December 2015, Pages: 127-130
Received: Dec. 16, 2015; Accepted: Dec. 27, 2015; Published: Jan. 11, 2016
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Authors
Charles John Elikwu, Department of Medical Microbiology & Parasitology, Ben Carson School of Medicine, Babcock University, Ilisan-Remo, Nigeria; Department of Medical Microbiology & Parasitology, Babcock University Teaching Hospital, Ilisan-Remo, Nigeria
Emmanuel Olushola Shobowale, Department of Medical Microbiology & Parasitology, Ben Carson School of Medicine, Babcock University, Ilisan-Remo, Nigeria; Department of Medical Microbiology & Parasitology, Babcock University Teaching Hospital, Ilisan-Remo, Nigeria
Victor Ugochukwu Nwadike, Department of Medical Microbiology & Parasitology, Ben Carson School of Medicine, Babcock University, Ilisan-Remo, Nigeria
Babatunde Tayo, Department of Medical Microbiology & Parasitology, Ben Carson School of Medicine, Babcock University, Ilisan-Remo, Nigeria
Chika Celen Okangba, Department of Medical Microbiology & Parasitology, Ben Carson School of Medicine, Babcock University, Ilisan-Remo, Nigeria
Opeoluwa Akinyele Shonekan, Department of Medical Microbiology & Parasitology, Ben Carson School of Medicine, Babcock University, Ilisan-Remo, Nigeria
Azubuike Chidiebere Omeonu, Department of Medical Microbiology & Parasitology, Ben Carson School of Medicine, Babcock University, Ilisan-Remo, Nigeria
Bibitayo Faluyi, Department of Medical Microbiology & Parasitology, Ben Carson School of Medicine, Babcock University, Ilisan-Remo, Nigeria
Pearl Ile, Department of Medical Microbiology & Parasitology, Ben Carson School of Medicine, Babcock University, Ilisan-Remo, Nigeria
Adebola Adelodun, Department of Medical Microbiology & Parasitology, Ben Carson School of Medicine, Babcock University, Ilisan-Remo, Nigeria
Adebusola Popoola, Department of Medical Microbiology & Parasitology, Ben Carson School of Medicine, Babcock University, Ilisan-Remo, Nigeria
Maxwell Mubele, Department of Medical Microbiology & Parasitology, Ben Carson School of Medicine, Babcock University, Ilisan-Remo, Nigeria
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Abstract
Enterobacteriaceae cause a wide range of diseases including urinary tract infections, respiratory tract infections, sepsis, and gastroenteritis. They are the most frequently recovered pathogens from clinical samples and have varying susceptibility patterns. The study set out to determine the susceptibility profile of enterobacteriaceae species at the Babcock University Teaching Hospital. Enterobacteriaceae were identified using the Microbact 12A kit (Oxoid UK) and susceptibility was determined with the modified Kirby-Bauer Method in line with CLSI 2014 guidelines. Escherichia coli the main isolate was 100% susceptible to Piperacillin/Tazobactam, 94% susceptible to Amikacin, 76.5% susceptible to both Ampicillin/Sulbactam and Ceftazidime, 70.6% susceptible to Ceftriaxone and Meropenem, 67% susceptible to Ciprofloxacin, 58% Susceptible to Gentamicin and 23.5% susceptible to Amoxicillin/Clavulanic acid. Antibiotic resistance among Enterobacteriaceae is on the rise in Babcock University Teaching Hospital. Measures should be put in place to prevent more resistance and to prevent spread of resistant strains.
Keywords
Antimicrobial Resistance, Escherichia Coli, Enterobacteriaceae, Babcock University
To cite this article
Charles John Elikwu, Emmanuel Olushola Shobowale, Victor Ugochukwu Nwadike, Babatunde Tayo, Chika Celen Okangba, Opeoluwa Akinyele Shonekan, Azubuike Chidiebere Omeonu, Bibitayo Faluyi, Pearl Ile, Adebola Adelodun, Adebusola Popoola, Maxwell Mubele, Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Enterobacteriaceae Isolated from Stool Samples at a Semi-urban Teaching Hospital, American Journal of Biomedical and Life Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 127-130. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbls.20150306.15
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Copyright © 2015 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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